Running toe nails

09.06.2019
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What is the Best Way to Treat Black and Bruised Toenail from Running? - Runners Connect

Anyone whos ever run a tough, hilly race or long run more than a few times, especially on trails, can probably guess what joggers toe refers to.

The black, bruised appearance of one of your toenails after it takes a beating during a run is accepted by some runners as an integral part of running, but when you have ablack toenail, running becomes difficult, and if left untreated, knowinghow to treat black toenail at home will be no help, as you will require more drastic treatment.

Injured toenails are not only painful and an ugly sight to look at, but can end up infected as wellthe warm, moist environment inside your shoes is the perfect home for bacteria.

Yuck.

This week, well be giving you the lowdown onrunners toenail problems;how to treat black toenail from running, what to do if yourtoenail fell off while running, and if youmost importantly,how long does a black toenail take to heal?

Black toenails from running are not only painful, but can end up infected or falling off. If your toenail hurts, this article will explain how common black toenails are for runners, what causes them so you can avoid black toenails in the future, and how to treat your bruised toenail correctly, so they can heal in less time.

Black toenails from running are not only painful, but can end up infected or falling off. If your toenail hurts, this article will explain how common black toenails are for runners, what causes them so you can avoid black toenails in the future, and how to treat your bruised toenail correctly, so they can heal in less time.

How Common are BruisedToenail From Running?

One survey of participants in a 1973 marathon reported that 14% of the runners suffered blisters, chafing, or loss of toenails that persisted for at least a week after the race.

A later study at the London Marathon found that only a few of the runners (0.1% total) treated at aid stations had toenail problems.

Both of these studies have their limits, of course, since a toenail problem alone is probably not serious enough to warrant a stop at an aid station, and subjects in the first study were probably more apt to respond to the survey if theyd suffered toe or skin problems.

The true prevalence of bruised toenail running injuriesis probably somewhere in between these percentages, and is likely dependent on the distances and terrain that individual runners cover in their training and racing.

My Toenail Hurts: What Causes Runners Toenails to Fall Off?

According to a 2004 review article by E.A. Mailler and B.B. Adams, the cause of black or blue toenail fromrunning is rooted in the repeated impacts that occur with each step.

After the initial impact with the ground, there is a brief moment where your shoe has come to a stop but your foot inside of it has not.

Your foot slides forward, usually only by a small amount, but this causes your toenails to take the brunt of the impact with the toebox of your shoe.

Additional stress is applied to your toenails when you push off from the ground, as your toes claw at the ground to gain additional propulsion.

Bruised toenail from tight shoes or shoes too big

As you might suspect, poorly-fitted or loosely-laced shoes can exacerbate the problem.

A shoe without sufficient room for your foot to slide forward will cause a more abrupt impact at your toenails, and a shoe with a toebox that is too low will push down on the top of your nails as you push off the ground.

Shoes that are laced too tight can compress the toenails as well, but conversely, a shoe that isnt laced tightly enough will allow your foot to slide too far forward, banging your nails against the front end of the shoe.

It may seem like we are nit picking, but lacing your shoes correctly can make all the difference, and is an easy way to preventblack toenails from running in the future.

More downhill running means more bruised toenails

If you already have a black and blue toenail from running, downhills canmagnify the problem, since they increase your speed and vertical impact force (and hence the momentum of your foot as it is sliding forward) as well as slanting your shoe downward, creating a ramp for your foot to slide down.

Longruns increase the chance ofrunners toenail problems

Longer runs and longer races obviously are more prone to cause problems with your toenails, since each step leads to additional stress on the nail.

The gradual swelling in your feet that occurs after youve covered many miles doesnt help either, as it effectively reduces the size of your shoe.

Given all of the factors at play, its not hard to see why ultramarathoners, who often do 20 or 30-mile runs over hilly trails, are renowned for their ugly toenails.

If you are following a marathon training schedule, for the first time, you may notice morebruised toenail from running, but they are almost a rite of passage as a runner, so dont panic!

Why your big toenail hurtsthe most

Mailler and Adams claim that the toes most commonly affected are the longest ones: the big toe, the second toe, and the third toe.

The relative lengths of these individual toes depends on the person, so if you have whats sometimes called an Egyptian foot (where your big toe is the longest), you will likely get blackened and bruised toenails on your big toe, whereas if you have a Greek foot (with either the second or third toe being the longest), these toes are more likely to get injured.

How to Help a Bruised Toenail: Bruised Toenail Healing Time

Mailler and Adams authored a later review of skin conditions in runners which detailed treatment and prevention options for joggers toe.

Correct fitting shoes

Keeping your shoes laced snug, but not too tight, and making sure the toebox is large enough to keep pressure off of your nails, even after extended periods of running where your feet have swelled up a bit.

Using an ankle lock lacing to secure your foot in the shoe can also be helpful, as it reduces the distance your foot slides inside of your shoe on footstrike.

Give your toes a little TLC

Keeping your toenails trimmed short and square (not curved) will also help evenly distribute stress on your toe.

If youve already got a blackened and bruised toenail, you can leave it alone if it isnt bothering your running.

If it is, you can try soaking in warm water to relieve some of the irritation.

Should you pop a blood blister?

According to Mailler and Adams, draining the fluid under the naileither by puncturing the nail itself with a hot needle or draining it from the front, underneath the toenail, is somewhat controversial.

Generally, it is best to leave the toe nail as is and not try to release the pressure.

The pain should subside in a few dayson its own, andattempting to pop the blood blistercould result in infection.

We recommendvisiting a doctor to be safe if you cannot handle the pain or pressure, but if you are determined to do this at home, heres how:

Sterilize a paper clip by putting it over a flame and heating the tip.

While it is hot, place the hot end on the nail, which will quickly melt through the nail and create a hole by which the fluid can escape.

To be safe, after the fluid is drained, put some antibiotic ointment in the hole and on the nail.

During yourbruised toenail healing time, consider this

You should be aware that some other skin and foot problems can masquerade as joggers toe.

Onychomycosis (or simply ringworm), a fungal infection of the nail, can also cause a toenail to appear discolored and bruised.

While it can be treated, albeit with some difficulty, as the fungus is embedded within the nail itself, it does need to be positively diagnosed by a doctor or, preferably, a podiatrist.

Additionally, melanoma, a serious cancer of the skin, can manifest underneath the toenails as well, making it sometimes hard to distinguish from a bruised toenail.

If your joggers toe doesnt seem to be improving, or if it appears infected and swollen, you should see a doctor before the problem gets any worse.

Joggers toe can be an annoyance, but if you take care of your feet and make sure your shoes fit right, it doesnt have to slow you down.

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running toe nails
Why Some People Develop Painful Toenails After a Run

Have you noticed that after a long run, a couple of my toenails are throbbing like they arebruised? You probably wonder whether this it is common for toenails to hurt after running and what you should do to prevent it.

Causes

Your toenails are sore and throbbing after a run because your toes are being slammed into the tip of the toebox of your shoe with every step, especially as you go downhill. There are a couple of elements that can contribute to this:

  • Your shoes are too small. Your running shoes should be one-half to a full size bigger than your regular shoe size because your feet will swell when you run and you need plenty of room in the toebox.
  • Your shoes are too big orworn too loose. If you have a sloppy fit, your foot may slide around more in the shoe with each step. This can contribute to more toenail trauma with each step.

Signs and Symptoms

Sore toenails may simply be tender when you press on the nailor throb even when don't touch them. In additions, you could experience foot problems such asblack toenails(which usually start as that throbbing pain in your toenails),blisters, orfoot numbness.

Diagnosis

If you're wondering if your current running shoes are the correct size, check the location of your big toe. If it's pushed right up against the front of the shoe, they're too small. Another easy way to check the fit is to remove the shoe's insert and stand on it. If any part of your toes is hanging over the end of the insert, your running shoes are too small.

Treatment

When you experience sore toenails, you will want to give them a chance to heal for a few days. You may want to wear open-toed shoes where they will not have any further trauma until they are no longer tender.

If redness develops or the pain worsens, you should see your doctor to be sure that you don't have an infection and get treatment if you do.

You may notice that you are developing a black toenail, which will probably lead to losing the toenail. While this can be distressing, it happens to many runners and the toenail will grow back.

Preventing Sore Toenails

One of the best tips for sore toenails is to learn to lace your shoes to retain your heel in the heel cup and prevent your feet from sliding forward in the shoe with each step.

Lace your shoe to the next-to-last eyeletLace over and down through the top eyelet on the same side to form a "bunny ear."Do the same for the other side.Pull the lace through the opposite "bunny ear."Tie your bow.

This lacing technique will pull the top of the lacing tight at the ankle while keeping the rest of the lacing properly tensioned.

Keeping your foot from sliding forward especially important for running routes that include downhill sections. You should stop and ensure your shoes are laced correctly before any significant downhills.

If your shoes have a sloppy fit, you can wear a thicker running sock. Look for versions that have more padding. You can even wear two pairs of socks. Lacing techniques can also help shoes fit better.

The bottom line is also that you need to get shoes that are the right size. When shopping for running shoes, make sure you go to a specialty running storeand have the salesperson measure your feet. Even if you think you know your shoe size, your feet can get wider and longer (due to falling arches), even as an adult. Also, it's best to try on new running shoes after a long run or at the end of the day, when your feet are already swollen.

A Word From Verywell

Sore toenails are a sign that you need to pay attention to the fit of your shoes. With the right fit and lacing techniques, you will reduce your risk of foot blistersand losing toenails. While toenail trauma is so common that it is a meme among marathoners, you don't have to join that club.



running - Toe nails damaged after marathon - Physical Fitness Stack Exchange

I find that my friend recently had a toe nail peeled off and the other leg's big toe nail is also about to peel off.
He asked me why does it peel off, for which I didn't have any answer.
Also the long distant cyclist have this complaint. Their toe nails peel off after a very long trip.

Why do they peel off?
What are the precautionary steps that can be taken?

1 Answer

Cool Running :: toe nails
Author Topic: toe nails becky24
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 09:17 AM Click Here to See the Profile for becky24 Click Here to Email becky24 Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
One of my toes is very discolored underneath the nail. I think there is a chance it may fall off. Is this bad, or just a little weird looking?

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jillian357
Member posted Jul-05-2007 09:27 AM Click Here to See the Profile for jillian357 Click Here to Email jillian357 Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
LOL...talk about timing! I just read your reply to MY post, and now I am replying to YOUR post!

I have the exact same thing....on both of my second toes as a matter of fact. I fully expect they will fall off shortly.
I have good shoes that I believe are fitted properly. I chatted with two gentlemen who own a local running store in my area (they are both runners too) and one of them said the exact same thing happens to him AND his wife. They will eventually fall off from what he told me.

Mine are actually thicker and protruding out. Are yours?

It freaked me out at first, but now I realize it's more like a battle scar from running...it definitely got worse as I put in more miles.

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Gregolowe
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 09:44 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Gregolowe Click Here to Email Gregolowe Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
How can that possibly be a good thing? "Battle scar"; I want to enjoy my running, not fight against it. It's discolored because it is bleeding underneath. It's bleeding underneath from the trauma of jamming your toenails into the front and top of your shoes. Ouch! This is not something I would want to adapt to or get used to. This would happen to me when I would go skiing because I wasn't skiing correctly, leaning back in my boots instead of downhill. When I learned how to ski correctly, it went away, of course. Learn how to run correctly, without your feet encased in material that binds it and keeps it from moving how it should, and you'll be fine. Run barefoot, or in a sandal.

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becky24
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 09:47 AM Click Here to See the Profile for becky24 Click Here to Email becky24 Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Gregolowe:
Learn how to run correctly, without your feet encased in material that binds it and keeps it from moving how it should, and you'll be fine. Run barefoot, or in a sandal. [/B]

I was just wondering if it does produce negative effects aside from just looking ugly. I don't believe I will try the running barefoot thing...actually running the half is when my toe first started to hurt a bit (even though my shoes are 1/2 size larger- but what caused it to bruise was when my brother stomped on my foot when I was wearing sandles...so this may not be directly related to running, but I know many runners have this problem so I thought some might be able to let me know if I should get this looked at, or just deal with it.

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Nobby
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 09:51 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Nobby Click Here to Email Nobby Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jillian357:
It freaked me out at first, but now I realize it's more like a battle scar from running...it definitely got worse as I put in more miles.

Yes and no. In most cases, yes, as you pile up more miles, you start to see some pains and aches; but at the same time, there are lots of pains and aches that could have been avoided or should have been avoided. Some of running-related injuries, in a lot of cases many people refer to as "over-use syndrome" when they are still hovorring around 25 miles a week or so, would be a good example.

If the shoe fits correctly, a lot of those problems should not occure. Black toe nails are a good example. When Arthur Lydiard started making shoes with the German company, EB; back in the 60s (or was it early 70s?), adidas was the mainstream athletic shoes. When Lydiard went to Germany for a lecture and talked about shoes, some of them came over afterwards and said they had the best shoes in the world. Lydiard told them to take their shoes off. Lots of black toe nails or missing toe nails. You see, Lydiard was probably running more than most athletes back then, preaching 100 miles a week training regimen; yet, he didn't have those problems (he was a shoe-maker by profession and built his own shoes as well as for his athletes). Back then, they really didn't have a concept of "toe box" and the shoe sort of levels off at tip. This concequently presses the top of your foot (toes) down and put extra pressure on your toe nails. This is where this "have a shoe a half size bigger" concept; so the tip of your toes actually comes a bit higher part of the end of the shoe. Of course, today's shoe a bit better constructed as far as toe-box is concerned, yet, people still follow this concept, resulting all sorts of other problems like blisters on the arch, rubbed Achilles, etc.

Some shoes, because the manufacturers are more concerned with cosmetics, put un-necessary junk on the upper and could press down certain spot. If it's the tip of your toe, you will most likely get black toe nail. I've been fortunate and haven't lost too many toe nails from running because I've been careful. Last one I had was actually from socks--it was too thick and not soft and, because my second toe is slightly longer than my big toe, put pressure on the toe nail (I knew it was coming about 1:50 into my 2-hour run). Sometimes it'll just grow out of it. Sometimes it will come off (in a worse case). I think I've actually "lost" my nail once or twice in my 30+ years of running. If it's the battle scar, I guess I didn't run hard enough! ;o) When it feels like it's lifting off, I'd cut a thin strip of bandage (less than 1/2 inch thick) and lightly wrap it around, making sure it won't press the tip down.

Believe me; I don't care who told you that but, if the shoe fits correctly, you shouldn't have those black toe nails.

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jillian357
Member posted Jul-05-2007 10:16 AM Click Here to See the Profile for jillian357 Click Here to Email jillian357 Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Wow, thanks for the heads up on this, I had no idea it "shouldn't" be happening.

I figured these gentlemen who spoke to me at the running store knew what they were talking about, but that obviously isn't the case.

I think I better be looking at getting some different shoes.

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slowgino
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 10:46 AM Click Here to See the Profile for slowgino Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by becky24:
I was just wondering if it does produce negative effects aside from just looking ugly...
...actually running the half is when my toe first started to hurt a bit (even though my shoes are 1/2 size larger- but what caused it to bruise was when my brother stomped on my foot when I was wearing sandles...
but I know many runners have this problem so I thought some might be able to let me know if I should get this looked at, or just deal with it.

It never produced any extra negative effects for me. I got this on my longer (one size longer) foot's big toe when wearing a compromise shoe size. A shoe long enough for the long foot was way too long for the short foot, whose heel would be very loose in that size.

Make sure the nail's cut very short and the shoe's not pressing down on it. Shoes are just tools. I've used a utility knife to cut slits to relieve pressure in a toe box. Works ok as long as the shoe is constructed so it won't come apart, but it does let rain and puddle water in a bit faster.

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jsprick
Member posted Jul-05-2007 10:53 AM Click Here to See the Profile for jsprick Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
I have had this happen twice in the last 6 years; the first time was my first marathon, and the second time was a few months ago after a half-marathon race. If it is a consistent thing for you, there is probably something wrong with the way your shoes fit (or maybe just your socks). But both times it happened to me, I am pretty sure I just went one day too long without trimming my nails. I never felt any pain from it, and I even think it's kind of cool when the nail is gone completely.

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Gregolowe
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 10:59 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Gregolowe Click Here to Email Gregolowe Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Becky, I assumed it came from your shoes since alot of trail runners and ultrarunners, of which I am one, speak of this phenomenon occuring in races. It usually comes from lots of downhill running. It will not produce any long term negative effects. It will grow back. Probably all of us have lost a toe nail at some time or another. It just looks weird. Don't worry about it. Now, if it was occurring on a regular basis from your running, then there's a problem. Why do that to yourself? Your toenails are there for a reason.

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Harper
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 11:05 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Harper Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Right now 5 of my toenails are purple, and 2 more have new nails coming in after the purple ones fell off.

I usually go with size 10.5, which is 1/2 size bigger than I would normally wear. I made the mistake of running ONE TIME in a size 10, and that resulted in 2 black toenails. Last week I got 3 new pairs of shoes. One brand, even in size 10.5, caused 3 toenails to go black after just a single run. Just b/c a shoe is a 1/2 size bigger doesn't guarantee happy toenails. The toe box area has to be big and you have to make sure your toes aren't hitting the top, front or sides while you run. Why stores like Fleet Feet don't carry E-width shoes is beyond me. D-width just isn't cutting it anymore for me, and I have relatively small feet for a man.

Even if you are wearing perfect shoes for your feet that never cause black toenails, a single run in adverse conditions (rain, lots of hills, who knows what) can cause several nails to go black.

Your newly blackened toenails will be sore for a few days, then look ugly for a few months until they fall off, and then look ugly for 2 or 3 more months while the new nail grows back. If you are unlucky enough to have this happen on your big toe, it's an 8 to 12 month process until your toe will look normal again.

The one major problem with black toenails is that it is often a self-perpetuating problem. The black toenail is usually thicker and bigger, being lifted up by the underlying bruise. And this often lends itself to further injury while the nail is only half-way grown out.

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Harper
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 11:19 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Harper Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
And I should add, you have to make sure to keep your toenails trimmed to just the right length. Too long can be just as bad as too short (too short can cause blisters b/c the toe won't be as protected or supported). Each nail will probably have a different required length.

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Nobby
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 11:57 AM Click Here to See the Profile for Nobby Click Here to Email Nobby Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jillian357:
Wow, thanks for the heads up on this, I had no idea it "shouldn't" be happening.

I figured these gentlemen who spoke to me at the running store knew what they were talking about, but that obviously isn't the case.

I think I better be looking at getting some different shoes.


With the same token, don't assume I'm right either! ;o)

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Nobby
Cool Runner posted Jul-05-2007 12:11 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Nobby Click Here to Email Nobby Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by slowgino:
I got this on my longer (one size longer) foot's big toe when wearing a compromise shoe size. A shoe long enough for the long foot was way too long for the short foot, whose heel would be very loose in that size.

Slowgino:

This is a bit of a digression from the original topic but... My right foot is slightly smaller than my left (perhaps not as much as 1/2 size though). I usually insert extra thin material (like Dr. Sch...whatever-his-name-is insole kind of thing). To me, usually a full insole is too much so I cut up a bunch of holes to make it feel even thinner. This usually solves the problem. I keep all my old insole from previous shoes and switech them around. Some are thicker than others and I would try to accommodate the slight size difference from right foot to left. Sometimes, not all the time, a small thing like this could solve the issue.

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slowgino
Cool Runner posted Jul-06-2007 12:08 PM Click Here to See the Profile for slowgino Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Nobby:
Slowgino:

This is a bit of a digression from the original topic but... My right foot is slightly smaller than my left (perhaps not as much as 1/2 size though). I usually insert extra thin material (like Dr. Sch...whatever-his-name-is insole kind of thing). To me, usually a full insole is too much so I cut up a bunch of holes to make it feel even thinner. This usually solves the problem. I keep all my old insole from previous shoes and switech them around. Some are thicker than others and I would try to accommodate the slight size difference from right foot to left. Sometimes, not all the time, a small thing like this could solve the issue.


Ok, thanks for the tip. My left foot is just a lot flatter than the right, so an insole-type solution might help with that.

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Abb94
Cool Runner posted Jul-07-2007 06:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Abb94 Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Could this also be caused by runnng hills when one is not used to that? I recently took a trip and ran in hills; normally I run in completely flat land. The day after I got back, my second toe started hurting and turning blue. I have been wearing the same model of shoes for a year and have never had problems with this.

Any thoughts on that?

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kestrou
Cool Runner posted Jul-07-2007 07:43 PM Click Here to See the Profile for kestrou Click Here to Email kestrou Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Abb94 - yes hill running can cause this, when it might otherwise not happen (as Nobby said).

I'm a big fan of Saucony shoes for general road running and racing - because they're known to "have a big toe box" (just ask around! )

When it comes to ultra distances though (my hands in the air) your feet are just going to take a beating and black toenails are gonna happen (often compounded by the wet conditions and downhill portions of hilly runs).

One thing that can help is "high and tight lacing of your shoes" to help prevent your feet from sliding forward in them. Here's a link with more info: http://inov-8.com/lacing.html - check out "Loop Lock High" on that page!

kestrou

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Nobby
Cool Runner posted Jul-07-2007 10:15 PM Click Here to See the Profile for Nobby Click Here to Email Nobby Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Abb94:
Could this also be caused by runnng hills when one is not used to that? I recently took a trip and ran in hills; normally I run in completely flat land. The day after I got back, my second toe started hurting and turning blue. I have been wearing the same model of shoes for a year and have never had problems with this.

Any thoughts on that?


Absolutely; particularly if it's hot and humid. Remember, when was it, 1999? Edmonton World Championships men's marathon--I didn't think Khannouchi would have a problem. That was, as far as I can remember, his first summer marathon, first champioships marathon where most likely people would start out slow (KK's usual 15-minute-5k vs. 15:50+) and it was very hilly compared to everything he was used to (Chicago, London). Granted, he HAD run summer road races, and some hilly course road races as well, I'm sure. But I actually thought he would drop out with blister. Of course, he did at around 15k. Same thing with Yuko Arimori in Atlanta. She wanted to run the marathon without socks but her coach, Koide, insistd she wear socks because of hot and humid condition plus all the ups and downs. To convince her, he had her do 30k time trial in the similar condition. She developed blisters and was convinced. Now I know we are talking about black toe-nails here. But the point is; they developed blisters because of slipping of the foot inside the shoe. Same can be said with black toe-nail.

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jamid
Cool Runner posted Jul-08-2007 10:03 PM Click Here to See the Profile for jamid Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
If the discoloration is yellowish or greenish it could be a nail fungus. A few years ago I cut my big toe right at the base of the nail. A few weeks later I noticed that the toenail was starting to turn black. I had no pain with it. Over time it went from black to purple to a yellow green color. It also started to thicken. I was pregnant at the time so it could not be treated and I breastfed for well over a year, and then developed some serious nasal polyps so I wasn't able to get it treated for about 2 years. I took Lamisil tablets for the fungal infection and the nail did eventually fall off. I spray my running shoes with Lysol after each use and I am very careful with trimming the nails. I really don't want another fungal infection.

On a side note, I found out that one can take 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar a day for the fungus and in a few months it will clear up. It has to be the natural apple cider vinegar with the "mother" in it.

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ziggyrottie1
Member posted Jul-24-2007 05:54 PM Click Here to See the Profile for ziggyrottie1 Click Here to Email ziggyrottie1 Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
I just lost my first toe nail!!!! I am concern about the gap I have between my toe and the toe nail bed. I am afraid I will get an infection from dirt and stuff getting in there. Does anyone have this problem? And what did you do for it? Help
quote:
Originally posted by Gregolowe:
Becky, I assumed it came from your shoes since alot of trail runners and ultrarunners, of which I am one, speak of this phenomenon occuring in races. It usually comes from lots of downhill running. It will not produce any long term negative effects. It will grow back. Probably all of us have lost a toe nail at some time or another. It just looks weird. Don't worry about it. Now, if it was occurring on a regular basis from your running, then there's a problem. Why do that to yourself? Your toenails are there for a reason.

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tallfran
Cool Runner posted Jul-24-2007 10:52 PM Click Here to See the Profile for tallfran Click Here to Email tallfran Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
I have not had it happen (yet!) from running, but it has happened to me twice from backpacking, about 18 months apart. Both times it was the big toe on my left foot, and was the result of a lot of downhills. Both times it was extremely painful and I had to go to a podiatrist and have the toenail removed.

The first time it was a blood blister under the toenail, and the second it was a blister like you would get on your heel except it was under the big toenail. When the docs punctured the blister, the toenail pretty much came off all by itself.

It healed well and I have had no problems with infection.

Strangely enough, it is on my smaller foot, and also the foot I tend to get heel blisters on. I think the foot slides around a little too much inside the shoe.

I would not look upon it as a badge of honor, but know you are in good company with a lot of elite runners who have had black toenails!

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Gotta have a dream
If you don't have a dream
How you gonna have a dream come true?

tallfran

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Toenails most commonly turn white from fungal infection or decreased blood supply to the nail bed. Parallel lines extending all
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Nail clippers is the best way to shorten a toenail. Nail files work as well. If you mean to remove
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Many runners are all too familiar with black toenails. The condition involves bruising, blistering, or bleeding beneath your nail from
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A yellowish spot on the nails may be a sign of one of the medical conditions known as Onychomycosis. This
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Table of ContentsThe natural color of a toenail is usually white. However, some occurrences make the toenails turn black or
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Toenails Turning BlueUsually toenails turning black and blue are caused by shoes that just do not fit right.If too
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Healthline and our partners may receive a portion of revenues if you make a purchase using a link on this
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Share on PinterestLeukonychia is a condition where white lines or dots appear on your finger or toenails. This is a
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In order to grow out your ingrown toenail, identify and remedy the ingrown toenail's cause. Most ingrown toenails grow
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Every workplace has its own unique morning-meeting culture. At Goldman Sachs, traders surely share their latest billion-dollar victories
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If you have an ingrown toenail, you may be experiencing a good deal of pain, redness, tenderness, and swelling. If
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Pinky nails curling:If your pinky (baby) toenails are curling, they may not retain their normal pink & glossy appearance
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Discolored toenail is a condition many people tend to ignore, but the condition may worsen and can be difficult to
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ZetaClear Review: Worlds Best *All-Natural* Toenail Fungus Treatment Clears Nails In 6-10 Weeks Heres how the
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Changes in your toenails may be a sign of an underlying condition. Toenails that have grown thicker over time likely
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Healthline and our partners may receive a portion of revenues if you make a purchase using a link on this
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Q. My client says she hasnt dropped anything on her toenail, but she admits that she picked the nail
07.06.2019
Toenails Turning BlueUsually toenails turning black and blue are caused by shoes that just do not fit right.If too
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