Nine inch nails 'the fragile' album cover

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The Fragile (Nine Inch Nails album)
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The FragileNine Inch Nails - The Fragile.pngStudio album by Nine Inch NailsReleasedSeptember21,1999RecordedJanuary 1997February 1999StudioNothing Studios, New OrleansGenre
  • Industrial rock
  • alternative rock
  • art rock
  • ambient
Length103:39Label
  • Nothing
  • Interscope
Producer
  • Trent Reznor
  • Alan Moulder
  • Dr. Dre (track 8)
  • Steve Duda (track 9)
  • Keith Hillebrandt (track 13)
  • Bob Ezrin (additional prod.)
Nine Inch Nails chronology Further Down the Spiral
(1995) The Fragile
(1999) Things Falling Apart
(2000) Halo numbers chronology Halo 13
(1999) Halo 14
(1999) Halo 15
(1999) Singles from The Fragile "The Day the World Went Away"
Released: July 20, 1999 "We're in This Together"
Released: September 27, 1999 "Into the Void"
Released: January 10, 2000

The Fragile is the third studio album by American industrial rock band Nine Inch Nails, released as a double album on September 21, 1999, by Nothing and Interscope Records. It was produced by Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor and longtime collaborator Alan Moulder. It was recorded throughout 1997 to 1999 in New Orleans.

Looking to depart from the distorted production of their previous record, The Downward Spiral (1994), the album features elements of ambient and electronic music, alongside the band's traditional industrial rock sound. Lyrically, the record brings over some of the themes from The Downward Spiral, including depression and drug abuse. The album notably contains more instrumental sections than their previous work, some of which span entire tracks. The Fragile is also one of the band's longest studio releases, clocking in at nearly one and three quarter hours long. The record was promoted with three singles: "The Day the World Went Away", "We're in This Together", and "Into the Void", as well as the promotional single "Starfuckers, Inc." and an accompanying tour, the Fragility Tour, which spanned two legs. Several accompanying recordings were also released, including a remix album, Things Falling Apart (2000), a live album, And All That Could Have Been (2002), as well as an alternate version of the record, The Fragile: Deviations 1 (2016).

Upon release, the album received a positive response from critics, who applauded its ambition and composition, although some criticized its length and lyrical substance. Retrospectively, it is cited by many critics and audiences to be among the band's best work. The album debuted at number one in the US, becoming their first chart-topper, and was eventually certified double-platinum by RIAA.

Writing and recording

.mw-parser-output .quotebox{background-color:#F9F9F9;border:1px solid #aaa;box-sizing:border-box;padding:10px;font-size:88%;max-width:100%}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatleft{margin:0.5em 1.4em 0.8em 0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatright{margin:0.5em 0 0.8em 1.4em}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.centered{margin:0.5em auto 0.8em auto}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatleft p,.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatright p{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-title{background-color:#F9F9F9;text-align:center;font-size:larger;font-weight:bold}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-quote.quoted:before{font-family:"Times New Roman",serif;font-weight:bold;font-size:large;color:gray;content:" ";vertical-align:-45%;line-height:0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-quote.quoted:after{font-family:"Times New Roman",serif;font-weight:bold;font-size:large;color:gray;content:" ";line-height:0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .left-aligned{text-align:left}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .right-aligned{text-align:right}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .center-aligned{text-align:center}.mw-parser-output .quotebox cite{display:block;font-style:normal}@media screen and (max-width:360px){.mw-parser-output .quotebox{min-width:100%;margin:0 0 0.8em!important;float:none!important}} The Fragile was an album based a lot in fear, because I was afraid as fuck about what was happening to me... That's why there aren't a lot of lyrics on that record. I couldn't fucking think. An unimaginable amount of effort went into that record in a very unfocused way.

Trent Reznor[1]

The Fragile was produced by Trent Reznor and Alan Moulder at Nothing Studios in New Orleans. There were some personnel changes within Nine Inch Nails after the Self-Destruct tour, which saw drummer Chris Vrenna replaced by Bill Rieflin and Jerome Dillon, the latter of whom would become Nine Inch Nails' full-time drummer until late 2005. Charlie Clouser and Danny Lohner contributed occasional instrumentation and composition to several tracks although the album was predominantly written and performed by Reznor alone. The Fragile was mixed by Alan Moulder and mastered by Tom Baker. The packaging was created by David Carson and Rob Sheridan.[2]

Music and lyrics

Over a year before the album's release, Reznor suggested presumably deliberately misleadingly that the album would "be irritating to people because it's not traditional Nine Inch Nails. Think of the most ridiculous music you could ever imagine with nursery rhymes over the top of it. A bunch of pop songs."[3]

In contrast to the heavily distorted instruments and gritty industrial sounds of their previous album, The Downward Spiral,[4] The Fragile relies more on soundscapes, electronic beats, ambient noise, rock-laden guitar, and the usage of melodies as harmonies. Several critics noted that the album was seemingly influenced by progressive rock, art rock, electronica, and avant-garde music.[5][6] It is categorized as an art rock album by The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004),[7] Edna Gundersen of USA Today,[8] and Will Hermes of Entertainment Weekly. Hermes views that, like "art-rockers" King Crimson and David Bowie, Reznor incorporates elements of 20th-century classical music on the album, "mixing prepared piano melodies a la John Cage with thematic flavor from Claude Debussy".[9] Music journalist Ann Powers observes elements of progressive rock bands King Crimson and Roxy Music, Reznor's influences, and the experimentation of electronica artists such as Autechre and Squarepusher, and writes that The Fragile uses funk bass lines, North African minor-key modalities, and the treatment of tonality by Symbolist composers like Debussy. The album also features several distorted guitar parts which Powers suggests that fans can enjoy.[10] Rob Sheffield observes a "prog-rock vibe" akin to Pink Floyd's 1979 album The Wall and feels that The Fragile is similarly "a double album that vents ... alienation and misery into paranoid studio hallucinations, each track crammed with overdubs until there's no breathing room".[11]

"About 10 years ago or so I locked myself away in a house on the ocean, and I tried to... I said I was trying to write some music. Some of which wound up on The Fragile. But what I was really doing was trying to kill myself. And the whole time I was away by myself, I managed to write one song, which is this song. So when I play it I feel pretty weird about it, because it takes me back to a pretty dark and awful time in my life. It's weird to think how different things are now: I'm still alive, I haven't died yet. And I'm afraid to go back to that place because it feels kind of haunting to me, but I'm going to go back. I'm going to get married [to Mariqueen Maandig] there."

Reznor, on the origins of the song, "La Mer", at a 2009 performance in Mansfield, MA.[12]

Described by Reznor as a sequel to The Downward Spiralan album with a plot detailing the destruction of a manThe Fragile is a concept album dealing with his personal issues, including depression, angst, and drug abuse. His vocals, for the most part, are more melodic and somewhat softer, a departure from his harsh and often angry singing in previous works. However, several music critics including Reznor noticed the lack of lyrics on the album.[13][1] The Bulletin interprets it as an industrial rock album about "fear and loathing that could compete with Pink Floyd's The Wall".[14] In some ways, The Fragile is a response to The Downward Spiral. Reznor compared the lyrical content of the two albums:

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I wanted this album to sound like there was something inherently flawed in the situation, like someone struggling to put the pieces together. The Downward Spiral was about peeling off layers and arriving at a naked, ugly end. This album starts at the end, then attempts to create order from chaos, but never reaches the goal. It's probably a bleaker album because it arrives back where it starts (with) the same emotion. The album begins "Somewhat Damaged" and ends "Ripe (With Decay)".[13]

The song "I'm Looking Forward to Joining You, Finally" is credited in the album's booklet as "for clara", suggesting that the song's topic, like "The Day the World Went Away", is about Reznor's grandmother, Clara Clark.

Fight Club author Chuck Palahniuk singled out "The Wretched" for comment: "I remember being amazed when I first heard this... This wasn't just ennui: this was an active, aggressive, angry lack of caring. It's not 'Let's kill ourselves'; it's 'Let's kill each other'... It's not rock 'n' roll and it's not classical. It's something in between."[15]

According to a CIA document entitled Guidelines for Interrogation Methods the song "Somewhat Damaged" was one of 13 songs played to detainees at Guantanamo Bay, supposedly as a means of torture.[16]

Packaging

Cover of an instrumental version of The Fragile, and the original full photograph of the waterfall

The cover artwork was designed by David Carson. A section within his book Fotografiks[17][18] reveals that the top section of the album cover is from a photo of a waterfall and the bottom section is from a closeup photo of the inside of a seashell. Carson elaborated on this further in an image on his website:

[The] back [cover] was going to be the front until the last moment. Trent changed it saying 'it was kinda irritating' yet something about it we liked so maybe it fit the music. Front cover flowers I shot outside of Austin, Texas. The 1 hour place called and said they messed up and used the wrong chemicals and the film was ruined. I said 'lemme see 'em anyway'. This is how they came out. Cover image is a waterfall in Iceland and a seashell in the West Indies.[19]

Promotion

On September 10, 1998, at the 1998 MTV Video Music Awards, a thirty-second teaser trailer was shown on television to promote the then untitled album.[20] It would be more than a year before the album was finally released.[20]

The first single, "The Day the World Went Away", was released two months before the album. "Into the Void" and "We're in This Together" proved to be the album's most successful singles. The B-side "Starfuckers, Inc." was released on the album as a track at the last minute, and served as a promotional single for The Fragile.

In support of The Fragile, the Nine Inch Nails live band reformed for the Fragility tour. The tour began in late 1999 and lasted until mid-2000, spanning Europe, Japan, New Zealand, Australia, and North America.[21] The tour consisted of two major legs, labeled Fragility 1.0 and Fragility 2.0. The live band lineup remained largely the same from the previous tour in support of The Downward Spiral, featuring Robin Finck on guitar, Charlie Clouser on keyboards, and Danny Lohner on bass guitar.[22][23] Reznor held open auditions to find a new drummer, eventually picking then-unknown Jerome Dillon.[24]

Nine Inch Nails' record label at the time, Interscope Records, reportedly refused to fund the promotional tour following The Fragile's lukewarm sales. Reznor instead committed to fund the entire tour himself, which quickly sold out. He concluded that "the reality is, I'm broke at the end of the tour", but also added, "I will never present a show that isn't fantastic."[25]

The tour featured increasingly large production values, including a triptych video display created by contemporary video artist Bill Viola.[26] Rolling Stone magazine named Fragility the best tour of 2000.[27]

In 2002, the tour documentary And All That Could Have Been was released featuring performances from the Fragility 2.0 tour. While making the DVD, Reznor commented on the tour in retrospect by saying "I thought the show was really, really good when we were doing it",[28] but later wrote that "I can't watch it at all. I was sick for most of that tour and I really don't think it was Nine Inch Nails at its best."[29]

Reissue

On September 21, 2009the tenth anniversary of the album's releasea Nine Inch Nails official Twitter update hinted that a deluxe 5.1 surround audio reissue of The Fragile was in the works and was scheduled for a 2010 release.[30]

During an interview with The New York Times that was broadcast on January 7, 2011, after questioned about the album Reznor explained:

The Fragile is weird because when it came out it felt like everyone hated it to me, and now it feels like it's everyone's favorite album, fan-wise. I was probably going to save this for some other announcement, but Alan Moulder's spent a couple of months restoring all the multitracks, prepping for a surround mix, and we plan on doing that this spring, and I'm not sure when it's going to come out but it's just something I'd like to get done and there's no record better than that to get surround mixed. It has to be Alan Moulder, and we both look back at that record I've just spent some time with him now, he's still a very good friend of mine and the experience of doing it in the bound that we had in literally two years, every day working together on that, was one of the best times in our lives. I think, in hindsight, I should have had [The Fragile] two single records, much Radiohead style with Kid A and Amnesiac, recorded at once, broken into two digestible chunks. Hey, it is what it is, but I thought about going back, redoing bits that I would mess around with to see how it would be if I were to do that record now, but I don't know if I should phase. Sometime this year expect something to come out surround-wise.[31]

While on tour in 2014 in Australia and New Zealand, Reznor was interviewed by a local reporter and was quoted about the reissue stating:

Yeah, we've done a lot of the work for that. Really what it's come down to is with all the other stuff going on, the Fragile thing in particular, I want to make sure I get it right. You know, we've mixed everything in surround, it sounds amazing, we have a great package ready to go. I just stumbled across 40-or-so demos that are from that era that didn't turn into songs, that range from sound effects to full-fledge pieces of music, and I kind of feel like - something should happen with that.

And I think it has something to do with that package, and I just need the bandwidth to kind of calmly think about it, and decide how much effort I want to devote into that and what to do with it. I have a lot of ideas that could eat up immense amounts of time and I'm trying to weigh out - just think it through. I don't want to pull the trigger on something and go, 'Man, I should have done it in this way.' And I just haven't had a chance to be in a calm place where I can think it through completely and make that decision.[32]

"The Fragile occupies a very interesting and intimate place in my heart. I was going through a turbulent time in my life when making it and revisiting it has become a form of therapy for me. As an experiment, I removed all the vocals from the record and found it became a truly changed experience that worked on a different yet compelling level. The Fragile: Deviations 1 represents Atticus and I embellishing the original record with a number of tracks from those sessions we didn't use before. The result paints a complimentary but different picture we wanted to share."

Reznor, in a press release for The Fragile: Deviations 1[33]

In June 2015, an instrumental version of the album was released to Apple Music.[34] This version of the album also includes alternative versions of "The Frail", "Just Like You Imagined", "Pilgrimage", "La Mer", "The Mark Has Been Made", and "Complication", the instrumental version of "The Day the World Went Away (Quiet)", an extended version of "+Appendage", a demo version of "10 Miles High" called "Hello, Everything Is Not OK", and three previously unreleased tracks from The Fragile ("The March" and "Can I Stay Here?")

In 2017 a reissue of the vinyl version of The Fragile was released, alongside an expanded, instrumental version, titled The Fragile: Deviations 1. This version of The Fragile contains all songs in either instrumental or alternate formats, and combines them with newly released songs written and recorded during the sessions for The Fragile. Deviations 1 consists of a one-off 4?LP pressing.[35]

Critical reception

Professional ratingsReview scoresSourceRatingAllMusic4/5 stars[36]Christgau's Consumer GuideB[37]Entertainment WeeklyA?[9]The Guardian4/5 stars[38]Los Angeles Times3.5/4 stars[39]NME5/10[40]Pitchfork8.7/10[41]Rolling Stone4/5 stars[11]Spin9/10[10]USA Today4/4 stars[8]

The Fragile received generally positive reviews from contemporary critics.[42] Mojo called it "an impressively multi-textured, satisfyingly violent sonic workout",[43] and Alternative Press found it "nothing short of astounding".[44] Edna Gundersen of USA Today called it "meticulously honed and twisted to baffle, tantalize, disarm and challenge the listener", and wrote that "the coats of polish ... can't camouflage Trent Reznor's perverse and subversive paths to musical glory."[8] Ann Powers of Spin called the album "a good old-fashioned strap-on-your-headphones experience".[10] Jon Pareles of The New York Times wrote that, although he "doesn't approach suicide as he did on" The Downward Spiral, "Reznor can hide in the studio and piece together music that's as cunning, and disquieting, as his raw anger used to be."[5] Will Hermes of Entertainment Weekly viewed that, even "if [Reznor's] emotional palette is limited, it remains broader than any of his metalhead peers", and that, "right now, hard rock simply doesn't get any smarter, harder, or more ambitious than this."[9] Robert Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times wrote that, despite its length, "this is a profoundly challenging and moving work that strikes at the hollowness of most contemporary pop-rock with bullwhip force."[39] The Guardian's Adam Sweeting praised it as "a fearsomely accomplished mix of monster riffing, brooding melodies and patches of minimalist soul-searching".[38] Rolling Stone writer Rob Sheffield felt that the album's "excess is Reznor's chosen shock tactic here, and what's especially shocking is how much action he packs into his digital via dolorosa."[11]

In a negative review, Pitchfork's Brent DiCrescenzo panned the album's lyrics as "overly melodramatic".[45] John Aizlewood of Q felt that it is "let down by Reznor's refusal to trouble himself with melody and by some embarrassing lyrics".[46] NME's Victoria Segal panned its music as "background" and accused it of "chas[ing] 'crossover'", with "grey rock sleet masquerading as a storm beneath a haze of 'experimental' textures."[40] Scott Seward of The Village Voice facetiously commended Reznor for "once again ... pioneering the marriage of heavy guitars, moody atmospherics, electronic drones and beats, and aggressive singing. Just like Killing Joke 20 years ago."[47] Village Voice critic Robert Christgau was even less receptive, writing that "Reznor delivers double-hoohah, every second remixed till it glistens like broken glass on a prison wall. Is the way he takes his petty pain out on the world a little, er, immature for a guy who's pushing 35? Never mind, I'm toldjust immerse in the music".[37]

The Fragile was included on several magazines' "end-of-year" album lists, including The Village Voice (number 14), Rolling Stone (number four), and Spin (number one).[48] In a retrospective review, The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004) gave it three-and-a-half out of five stars and wrote that, as "NIN's monumental double-disc bid for the art-rock crown, The Fragile sounds fantastic from start to finish, but there aren't enough memorable tunes underneath the alluring surfaces."[7] AllMusic editor Stephen Thomas Erlewine offered similar criticism, writing that "Reznor's music is immaculately crafted and arranged, with every note and nuance gliding into the next but he spent more time constructing surfaces than songs. Those surfaces can be enticing but since it's just surface, The Fragile winds up being vaguely unsatisfying."[36] In 2005, The Fragile was ranked number 341 in Rock Hard magazine's book of The 500 Greatest Rock & Metal Albums of All Time.[49] But, even if initial reception was mixed, the album has gotten a cult following from Nine Inch Nails fans. In 2016, Exclaim! listed The Fragile at number two on their "Essential Albums" list for Nine Inch Nails, citing it as their most ambitious work and "a tragic if not stunning portrait of depression."[50] Pitchfork would later reassess the album in their review of the album's 2017 "Definitive Edition", with a score change going from 2.0 to 8.7, describing it as Reznor's "magnum opus... The Fragile scrapes the sky like never before."[41]

Commercial performance

The Fragile debuted atop the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 229,000 copies, earning the band their first number-one album on the chart.[51] The album fell to number 16 the following week, becoming the biggest drop from number one at the time.[52] On January 4, 2000, the album was certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA),[53] and by May 2005, it had sold 898,000 copies in the United States.[51]

Steven Hyden of The A.V. Club writes that Reznor developed Nine Inch Nails from its role as a prominent rock act and by the time he finished recording The Fragile, alternative rock's overall popularity declined with several of Nine Inch Nails' contemporaries being disestablished or displaced by newer bands. Hyden also attributes the album's commercial performance to the rise of file-sharing on the Internet, which deviated from the alternative rock movement's emphasis on "fetishized vinyl" and "music festivals as peaceful places for young people to commune and dream of better futures."[54]

Track listing

CD

All tracks written by Trent Reznor, except where noted.

Left discNo.TitleLength1."Somewhat Damaged" (writers: Reznor, Danny Lohner)4:312."The Day the World Went Away"4:333."The Frail"1:544."The Wretched"5:255."We're in This Together"7:166."The Fragile"4:357."Just Like You Imagined"3:498."Even Deeper" (writers: Reznor, Lohner)5:489."Pilgrimage"3:3110."No, You Don't"3:3511."La Mer"4:3712."The Great Below"5:17Total length:54:51 Right discNo.TitleLength1."The Way Out Is Through" (writers: Reznor, Keith Hillebrandt, Charlie Clouser)4:172."Into the Void"4:493."Where Is Everybody?"5:404."The Mark Has Been Made" (includes a hidden intro to "10 Miles High")5:155."Please"3:306."Starfuckers, Inc." (writers: Reznor, Clouser)5:007."Complication"2:308."I'm Looking Forward to Joining You, Finally"4:139."The Big Come Down"4:1210."Underneath It All"2:4611."Ripe (With Decay)"6:34Total length:48:48

Cassette

This release is identical to the CD pressing, with the exclusive addition of "+Appendage" attached to the end of "Please".

Side 1.ANo.TitleLength1."Somewhat Damaged" (writers: Reznor, Lohner)4:312."The Day the World Went Away"4:333."The Frail"1:544."The Wretched"5:255."We're in This Together"7:166."The Fragile"4:357."Just Like You Imagined"3:49Total length:32:03 Side 1.BNo.TitleLength1."Even Deeper" (writers: Reznor, Lohner)5:482."Pilgrimage"3:313."No, You Don't"3:354."La Mer"4:375."The Great Below"5:17Total length:22:48 Side 2.ANo.TitleLength1."The Way Out Is Through" (writers: Reznor, Hillebrandt, Clouser)4:172."Into the Void"4:493."Where Is Everybody?"5:404."The Mark Has Been Made" (includes a hidden intro to "10 Miles High")5:155."Please (+Appendage)"6:19Total length:26:20 Side 2.BNo.TitleLength1."Starfuckers, Inc." (writers: Reznor, Clouser)5:002."Complication"2:303."I'm Looking Forward to Joining You, Finally"4:134."The Big Come Down"4:125."Underneath It All"2:466."Ripe (With Decay)"6:34Total length:25:15

Vinyl / 2017 Definitive Edition

This release of The Fragile contains the songs "10 Miles High" and "The New Flesh" (both of which were later released as part of the "We're in This Together" and "Into the Void" singles, dependent on territory.) "The Day the World Went Away", "The Wretched", "Even Deeper" and "La Mer" are all extended mixes, while the opening and closing of each side eliminates the crossfading between songs found on the CD and cassette versions, due to the nature of the vinyl medium. Finally, "Ripe" was shortened by removing the conclusive "(With Decay)" portion of the song. All of these changes made for the vinyl carry over to both the digital and the vinyl Definitive Edition pressings, released digitally in 2016 and physically in 2017.

Disc one, side ANo.TitleLength1."Somewhat Damaged" (writers: Reznor, Lohner)4:312."The Day the World Went Away"5:013."The Frail"1:544."The Wretched"5:36Total length:17:02 Disc one, side BNo.TitleLength1."We're in This Together"7:162."The Fragile"4:353."Just Like You Imagined"3:494."Even Deeper" (writers: Reznor, Lohner)6:14Total length:21:54 Disc two, side ANo.TitleLength1."Pilgrimage"3:312."No, You Don't"3:353."La Mer"5:024."The Great Below"5:17Total length:17:25 Disc two, side BNo.TitleLength1."The Way Out Is Through" (writers: Reznor, Hillebrandt, Clouser)4:172."Into the Void"4:493."Where Is Everybody?"5:404."The Mark Has Been Made"4:43Total length:19:29 Disc three, side ANo.TitleLength1."10 Miles High"5:132."Please"3:303."Starfuckers, Inc." (writers: Reznor, Clouser)5:004."Complication"2:305."The New Flesh"3:40Total length:19:53 Disc three, side BNo.TitleLength1."I'm Looking Forward to Joining You, Finally"4:132."The Big Come Down"4:123."Underneath It All"2:464."Ripe"5:15Total length:16:26

The Fragile: Deviations 1

The Fragile: Deviations 1The Fragile - Deviations 1 (2016).jpgCompilation album by Nine Inch NailsReleasedDecember23,2016RecordedJanuary 1997 February 1999StudioNothing Studios (New Orleans)Genre
  • Industrial rock
  • alternative rock
  • art rock
  • ambient
  • instrumental rock
Length155:46LabelThe Null CorporationProducer
  • Trent Reznor
  • Alan Moulder
  • Atticus Ross
Nine Inch Nails chronology Not the Actual Events
(2016) The Fragile: Deviations 1
(2016) Add Violence
(2017) Halo numbers chronology "Halo 29"
(2016) "Halo 30"
(2016) "Halo 31"
(2017) Professional ratingsReview scoresSourceRatingAllMusic3.5/5 stars[55]Pitchfork6.6/10[56]

The Fragile: Deviations 1 is an alternate version of The Fragile that contains all of the original songs in either instrumental or alternate forms, and combines them with newly released tracks written and recorded during the sessions for The Fragile. Deviations 1 consists of a one-off, limited edition four-LP pressing that was not made available on CD.[35]

Critical reception

The Fragile: Deviations 1 received generally positive reviews. Neil Z. Yeung of AllMusic recommended that fans listen to and understand the original album first before delving into Deviations 1.[55] Ultimately, he said that the release "serves as both a sonic time capsule and a reminder of one of NIN's most rewarding and underrated efforts."[55] Writing for Pitchfork, Sean T. Collins found Deviations 1 interesting but simultaneously perplexing, saying "Far too many of Deviations' freshly vocal-free songs sound like karaoke versions rather than instrumentals that can stand on their own. The result is a listening experience that outstays its welcome on a song-by-song basis, let alone over the course of its massive 150-minute running time."[56]

Track listing

Disc one, side ANo.TitleLength1."Somewhat Damaged" (instrumental)4:532."The Day the World Went Away" (instrumental)5:293."The Frail" (alternate version)1:464."The Wretched" (instrumental)6:00Total length:18:08 Disc one, side BNo.TitleLength1."Missing Places"1:262."We're in This Together" (instrumental)6:503."The Fragile" (instrumental)4:484."Just Like You Imagined" (alternate version)3:465."The March" (instrumental)3:42Total length:20:32 Disc two, side ANo.TitleLength1."Even Deeper" (instrumental)6:192."Pilgrimage" (alternate version)3:043."One Way to Get There"2:444."No, You Don't" (instrumental)3:165."Taken"3:35Total length:18:58 Disc two, side BNo.TitleLength1."La Mer" (alternate version)4:542."The Great Below" (instrumental)5:253."Not What It Seems Like" (instrumental)3:304."White Mask"3:225."The New Flesh" (instrumental)3:40Total length:20:51 Disc three, side ANo.TitleLength1."The Way Out Is Through" (alternate version)4:262."Into the Void" (instrumental)4:443."Where Is Everybody?" (instrumental)4:554."The Mark Has Been Made" (alternate version)4:44Total length:18:49 Disc three, side BNo.TitleLength1."Was It Worth It?" (instrumental)5:032."Please" (instrumental)3:303."+Appendage" (instrumental)3:194."Can I Stay Here?" (instrumental)4:255."10 Miles High" (instrumental)5:16Total length:21:33 Disc four, side ANo.TitleLength1."Feeders"2:022."Starfuckers, Inc." (instrumental)5:333."Complication" (alternate version)2:554."Claustrophobia Machine (Raw)"2:395."Last Heard From"2:06Total length:15:15 Disc four, side BNo.TitleLength1."I'm Looking Forward to Joining You, Finally" (instrumental)4:172."The Big Come Down" (instrumental)4:053."Underneath It All" (instrumental)3:214."Ripe (With Decay)" (instrumental)7:35Total length:19:18

Personnel

Credits adapted from AllMusic,[57] and The Fragile liner notes.[58]

Nine Inch Nails

  • Trent Reznor vocals, programming and production
  • Charlie Clouser keyboards, synthesizers, programming and additional sound design
  • Danny Lohner drum programming, synthesizers, guitars (tracks 1, 7, 8, 12, 15 and 19)
  • Jerome Dillon drums (track 5)

Technical personnel

  • Jeff Anderson artist relations
  • Emma Banks booking agent
  • David Carson art direction, design and photography
  • David 'Khan' Johnson merchandising
  • Alex Kochan booking agent
  • John Malm Jr. management
  • Ross Rosen legal
  • Susan Swan publicity

Additional musicians and production personnel

  • Steve Albini engineering
  • Tom Baker mastering
  • Adrian Belew guitars (tracks 7, 12 and 15)
  • Roy C. Bennett guitars
  • Clinton Bradley programming, technical assistant to Bob Ezrin
  • Paul Bradley programming
  • Paul DeCarli programming
  • Dr. Dre additional production, mixing assistance (track 8)
  • Steve Duda production, programming and percussion (track 9), chorus (tracks 9 and 18), violin (track 23), additional sound design
  • Bob Ezrin additional production (album sequencing)
  • Ken Friedman additional sound design
  • Mike Garson piano (tracks 7, 13 and 23)
  • Toni Halliday additional vocals
  • Page Hamilton guitar (track 10)
  • Leo Herrera engineering
  • Dan Hill additional vocals
  • Keith Hillebrandt programming and additional production (track 13), chorus (tracks 9 and 18), additional sound design
  • Cherry Holly trumpet (track 9)
  • Martin Kierszenbaum additional programming
  • John Lewis piano
  • Denise Milfort vocals (track 11)
  • Alan Moulder production, engineering and mixing
  • Dave Ogilvie engineering
  • Brian Pollack engineering
  • Kim Prevost vocals (track 14)
  • Porter Ricks keyboards, programming and synthesizer
  • Bill Rieflin drums (track 11)
  • Tony Thompson drums
  • Willie cello (track 11)

Choirs

  • Buddha Debutante Choir (track 2):
    • Heather Bennett
    • Melissa Daigle
    • Judy Miller
    • Christine Parrish
    • M. Gabriela Rivas
    • Martha Wood
    • Fae Young
  • Choir (track 8):
    • Di Coleman
    • Tracy Hardin
    • Gary L. Neal
    • Traci Nelson
    • Elquine L. Rice
    • Terry L. Rice
    • Rodney Sulton
    • Stefani Taylor
    • Barbara Wilson
    • Leslie Wilson
  • Buddha Boys Choir (tracks 9 and 18):
    • Eric Edmonson
    • Doug Idleman
    • Marcus London
    • Clint Mansell
    • Adam Persaud
    • Nick Scott
    • Nigel Wiesehan

Charts

Weekly charts

Chart (1999) Peak
position Australian Albums (ARIA)[59] 2 Austrian Albums (O3 Austria)[60] 14 Belgian Albums (Ultratop Flanders)[61] 36 Canadian Albums (Billboard)[62] 2 Finnish Albums (Suomen virallinen lista)[63] 10 French Albums (SNEP)[64] 27 German Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[65] 17 Japanese Albums (Oricon)[66] 15 New Zealand Albums (RMNZ)[67] 28 Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[68] 9 Scottish Albums (OCC)[69] 19 Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[70] 18 UK Albums (OCC)[71] 10 US Billboard 200[72] 1

Year-end charts

Chart (1999) Position US Billboard 200[73] 164

Certifications

Region Certification Certified units/sales Canada (Music Canada)[74] 2? Platinum 200,000^ United Kingdom (BPI)[75] Silver 60,000^ United States (RIAA)[53] 2? Platinum 898,000[51]

^shipments figures based on certification alone

See also

  • List of Billboard 200 number-one albums of 1999

References

^ a b Spitz, Marc (May 2005). "The Shadow of Death". Spin. Vol.21 no.5. p.65. ISSN0886-3032. Archived from the original on January 6, 2019. Retrieved January 27, 2017..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em} ^ "ALBUMS/EPS". NIN.com. Archived from the original on March 3, 2012. Retrieved March 6, 2012. Note: User must select "info" for each release one wishes to verify. ^ Q, May 1998 ^ Rage: August 21, 1999 Archived September 6, 2009, at the Wayback Machine Last accessed April 15, 2007. ^ a b Pareles, Jon (September 19, 1999). "A Rocker Practicing the Power of Negative Thinking'". The New York Times. Retrieved August 29, 2009. ^ Lipton, Mike. "The Fragile". Yahoo! Music. Archived from the original on January 28, 2013. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ a b "Nine Inch Nails: Album Guide". Rolling Stone. Jann S. Wenner. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ a b c Gundersen, Edna (September 21, 1999). "'The Fragile' is eerily glorious". USA Today. McLean. p.2.D. Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ a b c Hermes, Will (September 24, 1999). "The Fragile". Entertainment Weekly. No.504. New York. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ a b c Powers, Ann (November 1999). "Building a Mystery". Spin. Vol.15 no.11. New York. pp.179180. ISSN0886-3032. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ a b c Sheffield, Rob (October 14, 1999). "The Fragile". Rolling Stone. New York. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ La Mer Performance on YouTube ^ a b Nine Inch Nails: A Ransom Review Archived October 12, 2011, at the Wayback Machine Last accessed April 15, 2007. ^ Haynes, J.; Archibald, J.F. (2002). "The Bulletin, Volumes 63146317". The Bulletin. Vol.63146317. ISSN1440-7485. The tour was promoting The Fragile, an industrial-rock odyssey of fear and loathing to rival Pink Floyd's The Wall. ^ Q, June 2006 ^ 13 Songs used for torture Last accessed July 6, 2016. ^ David Carson and Philip B. Meggs (1999). Fotografiks. Gingko Press. p.192. ISBN978-1-58423-004-5. Retrieved April 24, 2010. ^ David Carson, Phillip B. Meggs:. "Fotografiks: David Carson (by David Carson and Phillip B. Meggs)". Gingkopress.com. Archived from the original on March 23, 2012. Retrieved April 2, 2012.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link) ^ Album cover explanation for The Fragile Last accessed April 24, 2010. ^ a b "Remember When Nine Inch Nails Advertised An Unfinished Album At The MTV Awards?". Kerrang. Retrieved February 2, 2019. ^ Elfman, Doug (June 2, 2000). "Quite a Contrast" (fee required). Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved February 1, 2008. ^ "Guitarist Robin Finck Leaves GN'R To Return To NIN". MTV. August 4, 1999. Archived from the original on November 15, 2005. Retrieved February 8, 2008. ^ Mancini, Robert (September 28, 1999). "Nine Inch Nails Line Up European Shows, But States Must Wait". MTV. Retrieved February 8, 2008. ^ Rashidii, Waleed. "Jerome Dillon New With NIN". Modern Drummer. Archived from the original on December 23, 2005. Retrieved February 9, 2008. ^ Soeder, John (April 9, 2000). "Rock's outlook bleak, but this Nail won't bend". Cleveland.com. ^ "Bill Viola Video Artist". Gergiev Festival. Retrieved February 8, 2008. ^ Heinz, Ryan (February 1, 2002). "NIN: It wasn't all it could have been". Western Courier. Retrieved February 19, 2008. ^ Saraceno, Christina and Austin Scaggs (June 8, 2001). "NIN Doing Fragility DVD". Rolling Stone. Retrieved February 1, 2008. ^ Reznor, Trent (July 21, 2004). "Access". NIN.com. Archived from the original on May 14, 2007. Retrieved February 1, 2008. ^ nails, nine inch (September 21, 2009). "And... we've begun work on the ULTIMATE reissue coming 2010. #thefragile". twitter.com. Retrieved June 29, 2017. ^ Video on YouTube ^ "Trent Reznor on 40 unreleased demos NZ tour Gone Girl Grammys | Entertainment | Newshub". 3 News. Archived from the original on July 5, 2014. Retrieved February 21, 2014. ^ Phillips, Amy; Strauss, Matthew (December 16, 2016). "Nine Inch Nails Announce New EP Not the Actual Events, Vinyl Reissue Series". Pitchfork. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Nine Inch Nails Release Instrumental Versions of 'The Fragile,' 'With Teeth' on Apple Music". Spin. Retrieved July 6, 2015. ^ a b "THE FRAGILE: DEVIATIONS 1 2017 LIMITED EDITION 4XLP + HI RES DIGITAL - Nine Inch Nails". NIN.com. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved December 16, 2016. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "The Fragile Nine Inch Nails". AllMusic. Retrieved May 27, 2019. ^ a b Christgau, Robert (2000). "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile". Christgau's Consumer Guide: Albums of the '90s. Macmillan Publishers. p.227. ISBN0-312-24560-2. Retrieved January 13, 2017. ^ a b Sweeting, Adam (October 1, 1999). "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile (Nothing/Island)". The Guardian. London. ^ a b Hilburn, Robert (September 19, 1999). "The Haunting, Revisited by Trent Reznor". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ a b Segal, Victoria (October 8, 1999). "Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". NME. London. Archived from the original on June 10, 2000. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ a b Collins, Sean T. (January 11, 2017). "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile (2017 Definitive Edition) / The Fragile: Deviations 1". Pitchfork. Chicago. Retrieved April 4, 2017. ^ Morse, Steve (April 30, 2000). "Trent Reznor Hammers Out His Own Turf". The Boston Globe. Arts section, p. K.4. Retrieved January 27, 2013. Critics have generally embraced The Fragile ^ "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile". Mojo. No.73. London. December 1999. p.110. ^ "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile". Alternative Press. No.136. Cleveland. November 1999. pp.1189. ^ DiCrescenzo, Brent (September 21, 1999). "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile". Pitchfork. Retrieved January 27, 2013. ^ Aizlewood, John (December 1999). "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile". Q. No.159. London. p.142. ^ Seward, Scott. Review: The Fragile Archived August 20, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. The Village Voice. Retrieved on August 29, 2009. ^ Accolades: The Fragile Archived June 16, 2010, at the Wayback Machine. Acclaimed Music. Retrieved on August 29, 2009. ^ [...], Rock Hard (Hrsg.). [Red.: Michael Rensen. Mitarb.: Gotz Kuhnemund] (2005). Best of Rock & Metal die 500 starksten Scheiben aller Zeiten. Konigswinter: Heel. p.73. ISBN3-89880-517-4. ^ "An Essential Guide to Nine Inch Nails". exclaim.ca. Retrieved June 29, 2017. ^ a b c Whitmire, Margo (May 11, 2005). "NIN's 'Teeth' Sparkle At No. 1". Billboard. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ Bronson, Fred (October 16, 1999). "Backstreet Vs. 'N Sync: Who'll Be No. 1". Billboard. Vol.111 no.42. p.102. ISSN0006-2510. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ a b "American album certifications Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". Recording Industry Association of America. January 4, 2000. Retrieved January 2, 2017. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH. ^ Hyden, Steven (July 10, 2012). "Trent Reznor made alt-rock's last stand with The Fragile". The A.V. Club. Chicago. Retrieved January 28, 2013. ^ a b c Yeung, Neil. "The Fragile: Deviations 1, Nine Inch Nails". allmusic.com. AllMusic. Retrieved November 24, 2017. ^ a b "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile (2017 Definitive Edition) / The Fragile: Deviations 1 Album Review - Pitchfork". pitchfork.com. Retrieved June 29, 2017. ^ "The Fragile - Nine Inch Nails | Credits". AllMusic. All Media Network. Retrieved November 29, 2018. ^ Track listing and credits as per liner notes for The Fragile album ^ "Australiancharts.com Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". Hung Medien. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Austriancharts.at Nine Inch Nails The Fragile" (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Ultratop.be Nine Inch Nails The Fragile" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Nine Inch Nails Chart History (Canadian Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Nine Inch Nails: The Fragile" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat IFPI Finland. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Lescharts.com Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". Hung Medien. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Offiziellecharts.de Nine Inch Nails The Fragile" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ ?????????????CD????????? [Nine Inch Nails CD album ranking] (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on October 11, 2013. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Charts.org.nz Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". Hung Medien. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". Hung Medien. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ 3, 1999/40/ "Official Scottish Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Swedishcharts.com Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". Hung Medien. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Nine Inch Nails | Artist | Official Charts". UK Albums Chart. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Nine Inch Nails Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Billboard 200 Albums Year-End 1999". Billboard. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "Canadian album certifications Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". Music Canada. January 19, 2000. Retrieved January 2, 2017. ^ "British album certifications Nine Inch Nails The Fragile". British Phonographic Industry. July 22, 2013. Retrieved January 2, 2017. Select albums in the Format field.Select Silver in the Certification field.Type The Fragile in the "Search BPI Awards" field and then press Enter.

External links

  • The Fragile at Discogs (list of releases)
  • Album review at The A.V. Club
  • Album review at The Washington Post
  • Playing God: The Fragile at Stylus Magazine
  • v
  • t
  • e
Nine Inch Nails
  • Trent Reznor
  • Atticus Ross
Studio albums
  • Pretty Hate Machine
  • The Downward Spiral
  • The Fragile
  • With Teeth
  • Year Zero
  • Ghosts IIV
  • The Slip
  • Hesitation Marks
  • Bad Witch
Extended plays
  • Broken
  • Fixed
  • Live 2013 EP
  • Remix 2014 EP
  • Not the Actual Events
  • Add Violence
Live releases
  • Closure
  • And All That Could Have Been
  • Beside You in Time
Remix albums
  • Further Down the Spiral
  • Things Falling Apart
  • Year Zero Remixed
Box sets
  • Halo IIV
Singles
  • "Down in It"
  • "Head Like a Hole"
  • "Sin"
  • "March of the Pigs"
  • "Closer"
  • "The Perfect Drug"
  • "The Day the World Went Away"
  • "We're in This Together"
  • "Into the Void"
  • "The Hand That Feeds"
  • "Only"
  • "Every Day Is Exactly the Same"
  • "Survivalism"
  • "Capital G"
  • "Discipline"
  • "Came Back Haunted"
  • "Copy of a"
  • "Everything"
  • "Less Than"
  • "God Break Down the Door"
Promotional singles
  • "Happiness in Slavery"
  • "Wish"
  • "Burn"
  • "Piggy"
  • "Hurt"
  • "Starfuckers, Inc."
  • "Deep"
Other songs
  • "Something I Can Never Have"
  • "Gave Up"
  • "Mr. Self Destruct"
  • "Just Like You Imagined"
  • "All the Love in the World"
Compilations
  • Lights in the Sky: Over North America 2008 Tour Sampler
  • NINJA 2009 Tour Sampler
  • The Fragile: Deviations 1
Games
  • Quake
  • Year Zero
  • Nine Inch Nails Revenge
Tours
  • Pretty Hate Machine Tour Series
  • Self-Destruct
  • Dissonance
  • Fragility
  • Live: With Teeth
  • Performance 2007
  • Wave Goodbye
  • Twenty Thirteen Tour
Current touring members
  • Robin Finck
  • Alessandro Cortini
  • Ilan Rubin
Former touring membersGuitarists
  • Richard Patrick
  • Danny Lohner
  • Jeordie White
  • Aaron North
  • Rich Fownes
  • Justin Meldal-Johnsen
  • Joshua Eustis
  • Pino Palladino
  • Eric Avery
  • Adrian Belew
Drummers
  • Jeff Ward
  • Chris Vrenna
  • Jerome Dillon
  • Josh Freese
  • Alex Carapetis
Keyboardists
  • James Woolley
  • Charlie Clouser
Backing vocalists
  • Lisa Fischer
RelatedBands
  • Option 30
  • The Innocent
  • Exotic Birds
  • Lucky Pierre
  • Prick
  • Pigface
  • Tapeworm
  • Marilyn Manson
  • How to Destroy Angels
  • Filter
  • Jane's Addiction
  • Queens of the Stone Age
People
  • Mariqueen Maandig
  • John Malm Jr.
  • Marilyn Manson
  • Kevin McMahon
  • Russell Mills
  • Rob Sheridan
  • Gary Talpas
Albums and songs
  • Natural Born Killers
  • Lost Highway
  • "Old Town Road"
  • "On a Roll"
  • Pretty Eight Machine
  • Radiant Decay
  • Recoiled
Articles
  • Discography
    • Songs recorded
    • Trent Reznor discography
  • Awards and nominations
  • Band members
  • Live performances
    • Concert tours
  • Nothing Records
  • The Null Corporation
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  • Beats Music
  • "I'm Afraid of Americans"
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  • Category Category
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Fragile_(Nine_Inch_Nails_album)&oldid=913899083"
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Nine Inch Nails
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Nine Inch NailsNine inch nails - Staples Center - 11-8-13 (10755555065 16053de956 o).jpgNine Inch Nails performing in November 2013
From left to right: Pino Palladino, Ilan Rubin, Trent Reznor, Alessandro CortiniBackground informationOriginCleveland, Ohio, U.S.Genres
  • Industrial rock
  • industrial
  • alternative rock
  • electronic rock
  • industrial metal
Years active1988presentLabels
  • Nothing
  • TVT
  • Interscope
  • Columbia
  • The Null Corporation
  • Capitol
Associated acts
  • Exotic Birds
  • How to Destroy Angels
  • Marilyn Manson
  • Gary Numan
  • A Perfect Circle
  • Pigface
  • Tapeworm
Websitenin.comMembers
  • Trent Reznor
  • Atticus Ross
Past membersList of Nine Inch Nails band members

Nine Inch Nails, commonly abbreviated as NIN (stylized as NI), is an American industrial rock band formed in 1988 in Cleveland, Ohio. Singer, producer and instrumentalist Trent Reznor was the only permanent member until the addition of English musician Atticus Ross in 2016.

Reznor recorded the debut NIN album, Pretty Hate Machine (1989), while working as a janitor at a Cleveland recording studio. After feuding with the label TVT Records about promotion, Reznor signed with Interscope Records and released the EP Broken (1992), with a different sound. Albums The Downward Spiral (1994) and The Fragile (1999) were released to critical acclaim and commercial success.

Following a hiatus, NIN resumed touring in 2005 and released their fourth album, With Teeth (2005), to further success. Following the release of Year Zero (2007), Reznor left Interscope, saying the label had "ripped off" fans. NIN continued touring and independently released Ghosts IIV (2008) and The Slip (2008) before a second hiatus. In 2013 NIN released their eighth album, Hesitation Marks (2013), under Columbia Records, followed by the EPs Not The Actual Events (2016) and Add Violence (2017) and their ninth album, Bad Witch (2018).

Reznor typically assembles a live band to perform with him. The band has varied over the decades, and as of 2019 includes Robin Finck, Alessandro Cortini, and Ilan Rubin. NIN tours often employ thematic visual elements and elaborate light shows, and songs are often rearranged for performance.

NIN have sold over 20 million records and have been nominated for thirteen Grammy Awards, winning for the songs "Wish" and "Happiness in Slavery" in 1992 and 1996 respectively. In 1997 Time named Reznor one of the most influential people, and Spin has described him as "the most vital artist in music". In 2004 Rolling Stone placed NIN at 94 on its list of the 100 greatest artists of all time. They were nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2014, their first year of eligibility, and again the following year.

History

Formation (19881989)

The letters N, I, and a backwards N set in a strong typeface within a simple black border. The band's logo, designed by Reznor and Gary Talpas

In 1987, Trent Reznor played keyboard in a Cleveland, Ohio band, the Exotic Birds, then managed by John Malm Jr.[1]:38 Reznor and Malm became friends,[2] and when Reznor left to work on his own music, Malm informally became his manager.[3] At the time, Reznor was employed as an assistant engineer and janitor at Right Track Studios.[4] Owner Bart Koster granted Reznor free access to the studio between bookings to record demos,[5][6] commenting that it cost him "just a little wear on [his] tape heads".[7] Reznor was unable to find a band that could articulate the material as he desired. Instead, inspired by Prince, Reznor played all the instruments but drums himself.[8] He has continued to play most parts on NIN recordings.[2]

The first NIN performance was at the Phantasy Theater in Lakewood, Ohio on October 21, 1988 as part of the Pretty Hate Machine Tour Series.[9] In 1988, after playing its first shows supporting Skinny Puppy, Reznor's ambition was to release one 12-inch single on a small European label.[10] Several labels responded favorably to the demo material and Reznor signed with TVT Records.[4] Nine demos recorded live in November 1988, collectively known as Purest Feeling, were released in revised form on the first NIN album, Pretty Hate Machine (1989).[1]:41 The overall sound on Purest Feeling is lighter than that of Pretty Hate Machine; several songs contain more live drumming and guitar, as well as a heavier use of film samples.[11]

Reznor chose the name "Nine Inch Nails" because it "abbreviated easily" rather than for "any literal meaning".[12] Other rumored explanations have circulated, alleging that Reznor chose to reference Jesus' crucifixion with nine-inch spikes,[13]:57 or Freddy Krueger's nine-inch fingernails.[14][15] The English letters NIN are also noted for their resemblance to the modern Hebrew characters of the Tetragrammaton.[16] The Nine Inch Nails logo first appeared on the music video for their debut single, "Down in It", a. The logo was designed by Reznor and Gary Talpas, inspired by Tibor Kalman's typography on the Talking Heads album Remain in Light.[17][18] Talpas, a native of Cleveland, continued to design Nine Inch Nails packaging until 1997.[19]

Pretty Hate Machine (19891991)

Written, arranged, and performed by Reznor,[20] Nine Inch Nails' first album Pretty Hate Machine debuted in 1989.[21] It marked his first collaboration with Adrian Sherwood (who produced the lead single "Down in It" in London without meeting Reznor face-to-face)[10] and Mark "Flood" Ellis.[1]:42 Reznor asked Sean Beavan to mix the demos of Pretty Hate Machine, which had received multiple offers for record deals.[22] He mixed sound during Nine Inch Nails' live concerts for several years,[23] eventually becoming an unofficial member of the live band and singing live backup vocals from his place at the mixing console.[24] Flood's production would appear on each major Nine Inch Nails release until 1994, and Sherwood has made remixes for the band as recently as 2000. Reznor and his co-producers expanded upon the Right Track Studio demos by adding singles "Head Like a Hole" and "Sin".[25] Rolling Stone's Michael Azerrad described the album as "industrial-strength noise over a pop framework" and "harrowing but catchy music";[26] Reznor proclaimed this combination "a sincere statement" of "what was in [his] head at the time".[27] In fact, the song "Down in It" spent over two months on Billboard's club-play dance chart.[28] After spending 113 weeks on the Billboard 200,[29] Pretty Hate Machine became one of the first independently released records to attain platinum certification.[4]

A man caked in mud screaming into a microphone. Reznor during the 1991 Lollapalooza festival

Three music videos were created in promotion of the album. MTV aired the videos for "Down in It" and "Head Like a Hole", but an explicit video for "Sin" was only released in partial form for Closure. The original version of the "Down in It" video ended with the implication that Reznor's character had fallen off a building and died in the street.[30] This footage attracted the attention of the FBI. As Reznor explains in an interview with Convulsion Magazine:

There was a scene w[h]ere I was lying on the ground, appearing to be dead, in a Lodger-esque pose and we had a camera with a big weather balloon filled with helium hooked up to it... the first one we did, we started the film, I was laying on the ground and the ropes that were holding the balloon snapped, the camera just took off into the atmosphere... the camera landed two hundred miles away in a farmer's field somewhere. He finds it and takes it to the police, thinking that it's a surveillance camera for marijuana, they develop the film and think that it's some sort of snuff film of a murder, give it to the FBI and have pathologists looking at the body saying, 'yeah, he's rotting,' (I had corn starch on me, right) 'he's been decomposing for 3 weeks.' You could see the other members of the band walking away and they had these weird outfits on, and they thought it was some kind of gang slaying.[31]

In 1989, while doing promotion for the album, the band members were asked what shows they would like to appear on. They jokingly replied (possibly while intoxicated) that they would like to appear on Dance Party USA, since it was the most absurd option they could think of at the time. Much to their surprise, they were booked on the show, and made an appearance.[32]

In 1990, Nine Inch Nails began the Pretty Hate Machine Tour Series, in which it toured North America as an opening act for alternative rock artists such as Peter Murphy and The Jesus and Mary Chain.[4][1]:41[33] Reznor began smashing his equipment while on stage; Rockbeat interviewer Mike Gitter attributed the live band's early success in front of rock oriented audiences to this aggressive attitude.[34] Nine Inch Nails then embarked on a world tour that continued through the first Lollapalooza festival in 1991.[1]:42

Record label dispute and Broken (19921993)

After a poor European reception opening for Guns N' Roses,[35] the band returned to America amid pressure from TVT to produce a follow-up to Pretty Hate Machine.[36] After finding out they were hindering control of his project, Reznor criticized the labeling of Nine Inch Nails as a commercially oriented band and demanded his label terminate his contract, but they ignored his plea.[37] In response, Reznor secretly began recording under various pseudonyms to avoid record company interference.[38] Involved in a feud with TVT, he signed a record deal with Interscope Records and created Nothing Records:

We made it very clear we were not doing another record for TVT. But they made it pretty clear they weren't ready to sell. So I felt like, well, I've finally got this thing going but it's dead. Flood and I had to record Broken under a different band name, because if TVT found out we were recording, they could confiscate all our shit and release it. Jimmy Iovine got involved with Interscope, and we kind of got slave-traded. It wasn't my doing. I didn't know anything about Interscope. And I was real pissed off at him at first because it was going from one bad situation to potentially another one. But Interscope went into it like they really wanted to know what I wanted. It was good, after I put my raving lunatic act on.[1]:42

In 1992, Nine Inch Nails relocated to 10050 Cielo Drive, Benedict Canyon, Los Angeles (renamed "Le Pig" by Reznor), the site of the Tate murders, when Charles Manson's "family" murdered Sharon Tate,[39] wife of noted film director Roman Polanski, and four of her friends.[4][1]:42 The band used it to record Broken, an extended play (EP) that was the first Nine Inch Nails release distributed by Interscope Records[40] and reached the top 10 on the Billboard 200.[41] In the liner notes, Reznor credited the 1991 Nine Inch Nails touring band as an influence on the EP's sound.[42] He characterized Broken as a guitar-based "blast of destruction", and as "a lot harder... than Pretty Hate Machine".[13] The inspiration for the harder sound came from the way the live band played during concerts such as Lollapalooza.[43] Songs from Broken earned Nine Inch Nails two Grammy Awards: a performance of the EP's first single "Happiness in Slavery" from Woodstock '94,[44] and the second single "Wish".[44] In reference to receiving the Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance for "Wish", Reznor joked that "Wish" became "the only song to ever win a Grammy that says 'fist fuck' in the lyrics."[45] Against touring of the brand new material, Reznor began living and recording full-time at Le Pig, working on a follow-up free of restrictions from his record label.[1]:42

Peter Christopherson of the bands Coil and Throbbing Gristle directed a performance video for "Wish",[46] but the EP's most controversial video accompanied "Happiness in Slavery".[47] The video was almost universally banned[47] for its graphic depiction of performance artist Bob Flanagan disrobed and lying on a machine that pleasures, tortures, then kills him.[48] A third video for "Pinion", partially incorporated into MTV's Alternative Nation opening sequence, showed a toilet that apparently flushes into the mouth of a person in bondage.[49] Reznor and Christopherson compiled the three clips along with footage for "Help Me I Am in Hell" and "Gave Up" into a longform music video titled Broken.[50] It depicts the murder of a young man who is kidnapped and tortured while forced to watch the videos.[50] This footage was never officially released, but instead appeared covertly among tape trading circles.[48][50] A separate performance video for "Gave Up" featuring Richard Patrick and Marilyn Manson was filmed at Le Pig. A live recording of "Wish" was also filmed, and both videos appeared in Closure.[51]

Broken was followed by the companion remix EP Fixed in late 1992.[50] The only track that was left off the final version of the release is the remix of "Last", produced by Butch Vig (the outro of the "Last" remix is heard in "Throw This Away", which also includes Reznor's remix of "Suck").[52] The unedited version appeared on the internet as an 8-bit mono 11kHz file, "NIN_LAST.AIFF", available by FTP from cyberden.com in 1993; it has been removed from the website, but can still be found on p2p networks (Reznor subsequently made it available in higher quality (256kbit/s mp3) at remix.nin.com). Vig later spoke about his remix while answering questions on a music production forum, saying "I started recording a lot of new parts, and took it in a much different direction. When it was finished, Trent thought the front part of the mix didn't fit the EP, so he just used the ending. I'm glad it's on his website. Duke and Steve worked with me on the remix, in the very early days of Garbage."[53]

The Downward Spiral (19931997)

Reznor performing during the Self-Destruct tour, circa 19941995

Early ideas for The Downward Spiral were conceived after the Lollapalooza 1991 festival concerts ended in September of that year.[54] Reznor developed a concept about the album's themes and later used it as lyrics.[1]:42 He searched for and moved to 10050 Cielo Drive, renting it for $11,000 per month from July 4, 1992, marking the beginning of the making of both Broken and The Downward Spiral.[55][56] This was against his initial choice to record the album in New Orleans.[57]

Nine Inch Nails' second studio album, The Downward Spiral, entered the Billboard 200 at number two,[58] and remains the highest-selling Nine Inch Nails release in the United States for shipments of over four million copies, in addition to selling five million copies worldwide.[59] Influenced by late-1970s works by Pink Floyd and David Bowie,[4] The Downward Spiral includes a wide range of textures and moods to illustrate the mental progress of a central character.[60] Flood co-produced several tracks on the album, while Alan Moulder mixed most of the album[61] and subsequently took on more extensive production duties for future album releases. Reznor invited Sean Beavan to work on The Downward Spiral.[1] After contributing to remixes of Nine Inch Nails songs, such as "Closer", Beavan mixed and co-produced Marilyn Manson's Antichrist Superstar in 1996.[62] As well as Broken, The Downward Spiral was recorded at Le Pig Studios.[39] "March of the Pigs" and "Closer" were released as singles. Two other songs from the album, "Hurt" and "Piggy", were issued to radio without a commercial single release.

The music video for "Closer" was directed by Mark Romanek and received frequent rotation on MTV, though the network heavily censored the original version, which they perceived to be too graphic.[63] The video shows events in a laboratory dealing with religion, sexuality, animal cruelty, politics, and terror; controversial imagery included a nude bald woman with a crucifix mask, a monkey tied to a cross, a pig's head spinning on some type of machine, a diagram of a vulva, Reznor wearing an S&M mask while swinging in shackles, and of him wearing a ball gag.[64] A radio edit that partially mutes the song's explicit lyrics also received extensive airtime.[1]:96

Critical response to The Downward Spiral was generally favorable, and retrospective reviews regard it as one of the most important albums of the 1990s. It was included in several publications' best album lists: in 2005 the album was ranked 25th in Spin's list of the "100 Greatest Albums, 19852005",[65] and in 2003 Rolling Stone ranked the album number 200 on their "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" list.[66] Blender named it the 80th Greatest American Album. It was ranked No.488 in the book The Top 500 Heavy Metal Albums of All Time by Martin Popoff. In 2001 Q named The Downward Spiral as one of the 50 Heaviest Albums of All Time;[67] in 2010 the album was ranked No.102 on their 250 Best Albums of Q's Lifetime (19862011) list.[68] After The Downward Spiral's release, Reznor produced an accompanying remix album entitled Further Down the Spiral, the only non-major Nine Inch Nails release to be certified gold in the United States[59] and among the best-selling remix albums of all time. It contained contributions from Coil with Danny Hyde, electronic musician Aphex Twin, producer Rick Rubin, and Jane's Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro, among others.[69]

After the 1994 release of The Downward Spiral, the live band embarked on the Self Destruct Tour in support of the album. The stage set-up contained dirty curtains which would be pulled down and up for visuals shown during songs such as "Hurt". The tour debuted the band's grungy and messy image in which the members would come out in ragged clothes slathered in corn starch. The concerts were violent and chaotic, with band members often injuring themselves, and they would frequently destroy their instruments at the end of concerts, attack each other, and stage-dive into the crowd.[70] The tour reached its widest mainstream audience with a mud-drenched performance at Woodstock '94 that was broadcast on Pay-Per-View and seen in as many as 24million homes.[71][72] Nine Inch Nails received considerable mainstream success thereafter, performing with significantly higher production values and adding theatrical visual elements to the live show. Supporting acts for the tour included The Jim Rose Circus and Marilyn Manson.[73] Released in 1997, the Closure video documented highlights from the tour, including full live videos of "Eraser", "Hurt" and a one-take "March of the Pigs" clip directed by Peter Christoperson.[74] Around this time, Reznor's studio perfectionism,[75] struggles with addiction, and bouts of writer's block prolonged the production of The Fragile.[76]

The Fragile and first hiatus (19992003)

Five years elapsed between The Downward Spiral and Nine Inch Nails' next studio album, The Fragile, which arrived as a double album in September 1999.[77] The Fragile was conceived by making "songwriting and arranging and production and sound design... the same thing. A song would start with a drum loop or a visual and eventually a song would emerge out of it and that was the song."[78] Canadian rock producer Bob Ezrin was consulted on the album's track listing; the liner notes state that he "provided final continuity and flow."[79]

On the heels of the band's previous successes, media anticipation surrounded The Fragile more than a year before its release,[80] when it was already described as "oft-delayed".[81] The album debuted at number one on the Billboard 200, selling 228,000 copies in its first week and receiving generally positive reviews.[77] Spin hailed The Fragile as the "album of the year," whereas Pitchfork Media panned its "melodramatic" lyrics.[82][83] Nine Inch Nails released three commercial singles from the album in different territories: "The Day the World Went Away" in North America; "We're in This Together" in the EU and Japan (on three separate discs); and "Into the Void" in Australia. Several songs from the album became regulars on alternative rock radio stations, however the album dropped to number 16 and slipped out of the Billboard Top 10 only a week after its release, resulting in the band setting a record for the biggest drop from number one, which has since been broken.[84] Reznor funded the subsequent North American tour out of his own pocket.[77]

Before the album's release, the song "Starfuckers, Inc." provoked media speculation about whom Reznor had intended its acerbic lyrics to satirize.[85] Cinesexuality critic Patricia MacCormack interprets the song as a "scathing attack on the alternative music scene," particularly Reznor's former friend and protege Marilyn Manson.[86] The two artists put aside their differences when Manson appeared in the song's music video, retitled "Starsuckers, Inc." and performed on stage with Nine Inch Nails at Madison Square Garden in 2000.[87]

Reznor followed The Fragile with another remix album, Things Falling Apart, released in November 2000 to poor reviews, a few months after the 2000 Fragility tour which itself was recorded and released on CD, DVD, and VHS in 2002 as And All That Could Have Been. A deluxe edition of the live CD came with the companion disc Still, containing stripped-down versions of songs from the Nine Inch Nails catalog along with several new pieces of music.[87]

During the Fragility 2.0 tour, Reznor suffered a heroin overdose in London in June 2000, forcing a gig which was to be played that night to be cancelled. The incident pushed Reznor into entering rehab, putting Nine Inch Nails on hold while he attempted to become sober.[88]

In 2002, Johnny Cash covered the Nine Inch Nails' "Hurt" for his album, American IV: The Man Comes Around, to critical acclaim.[89] After seeing the music video, which later won a Grammy,[90] Reznor himself became a fan of the rendition:

I pop the video in, and wow... Tears welling, silence, goose-bumps... Wow. [I felt like] I just lost my girlfriend, because that song isn't mine anymore... It really made me think about how powerful music is as a medium and art form. I wrote some words and music in my bedroom as a way of staying sane, about a bleak and desperate place I was in, totally isolated and alone. [Somehow] that winds up reinterpreted by a music legend from a radically different era/genre and still retains sincerity and meaning different, but every bit as pure.[91]

With Teeth (20042006)

A man playing guitar and singing into a microphone on stage in front of a series of red teeth-like light patterns. Live performance during the Live: With Teeth tour in 2006

A further six years elapsed before Nine Inch Nails' fourth full-length album. With Teeth was released in May 2005, though it was leaked prior to its official release date. The album was written and recorded throughout 2004 following Reznor's battle with alcoholism and substance abuse and legal issues with his former manager, John Malm Jr.[92] With Teeth debuted on top of the Billboard 200, Nine Inch Nails' second reign at number one with an album.[93] The album's package lacks typical liner notes; instead it simply lists the names of songs and co-producers, and the URL for an online PDF poster with lyrics and full credits.[94] The entire album was made available in streaming audio on the band's official MySpace page in advance of its release date.[95]

Critical reception of the album was mostly positive:[96] Rolling Stone's Rob Sheffield described the album as "vintage Nine Inch Nails".[97] PopMatters condemned the album, claiming Reznor "ran out of ideas."[98]

.mw-parser-output .quotebox{background-color:#F9F9F9;border:1px solid #aaa;box-sizing:border-box;padding:10px;font-size:88%;max-width:100%}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatleft{margin:0.5em 1.4em 0.8em 0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatright{margin:0.5em 0 0.8em 1.4em}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.centered{margin:0.5em auto 0.8em auto}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatleft p,.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatright p{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-title{background-color:#F9F9F9;text-align:center;font-size:larger;font-weight:bold}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-quote.quoted:before{font-family:"Times New Roman",serif;font-weight:bold;font-size:large;color:gray;content:" ";vertical-align:-45%;line-height:0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-quote.quoted:after{font-family:"Times New Roman",serif;font-weight:bold;font-size:large;color:gray;content:" ";line-height:0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .left-aligned{text-align:left}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .right-aligned{text-align:right}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .center-aligned{text-align:center}.mw-parser-output .quotebox cite{display:block;font-style:normal}@media screen and (max-width:360px){.mw-parser-output .quotebox{min-width:100%;margin:0 0 0.8em!important;float:none!important}} I think, fundamentally, music is something inherently people love and need and relate to, and a lot of what's out right now feels like McDonalds. It's quick-fix. You kind of have a stomachache afterwards.

Trent Reznor, Salt Lake Tribune interview (2005)[99]

A music video for the song "The Hand That Feeds" premiered on the Nine Inch Nails official website in March 2005. Reznor released the source files for it in GarageBand format a month later, allowing fans to remix the song.[100] He similarly released files for the album's second single "Only" in a wider range of formats, including Pro Tools and ACID Pro. David Fincher directed a video for "Only" with primarily computer-generated imagery. The planned music video for its third single, "Every Day Is Exactly the Same", was directed by Francis Lawrence but reportedly scrapped in the post-production stage.[101] All three singles topped the Billboard Alternative Songs chart.[102]

Nine Inch Nails launched a North American arena tour in Autumn 2005, supported by Queens of the Stone Age, Autolux and Death from Above 1979.[103] Another opening act on the tour, hip-hop artist Saul Williams, performed on stage with Nine Inch Nails at the Voodoo Music Experience festival during a headlining appearance in hurricane-stricken New Orleans, Reznor's former home.[104] The Nine Inch Nails live band completed a tour of North American amphitheaters in the summer of 2006, joined by Bauhaus, TV on the Radio, and Peaches.[4] The Beside You in Time tour documentary was released in February 2007 via three formats: DVD, HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc.[105] The home video release debuted at number one on both the Billboard Top Music Videos and Billboard Comprehensive Music Videos charts in the United States.[106]

Year Zero (20062007)

A black-and-white flier with the words "Art is Resistance" with a stenciled flag of four sections and a single star. An Art is Resistance flyer from the Year Zero alternate reality game

Nine Inch Nails' fifth studio album, Year Zero, was released only two years after With Teeth, a marked change in the slow pace from the release of previous albums. With lyrics written from the perspective of multiple fictitious characters, Year Zero is a concept album criticizing the United States government's policies and their impact on the world 15 years in the future.[107] Critical response to the album was generally favorable, with an average rating of 76% on Metacritic.[108]

The story takes place in the United States in 2022, which has been termed "Year 0", by the government, being the year America was reborn.[109] It had suffered several major terrorist attacks, apparently by Islamic fundamentalists, including attacks on Los Angeles and Seattle, and in response, the government seized absolute control of the country. The government is a Christian fundamentalist theocracy, maintaining control of the populace through institutions like the Bureau of Morality and the First Evangelical Church of Plano.[110] The government corporation Cedocore distributes the drug Parepin through the water supply, making Americans who drink water apathetic and carefree.[111] There are several underground rebel groups, mainly operating online, most notably Art is Resistance and Solutions Backwards Initiative.[107] In response to the increasing oppression of the government, several corporate, government, and subversive websites were transported back in time to the present by a group of scientists working clandestinely against the authorities. The websites-from-the-future were sent to the year 2007 to warn American people of the impending dystopian future and to prevent it from ever forming in the first place.[112]

An alternate reality game emerged parallel to the Year Zero concept, expanding upon its storyline. Clues hidden on tour merchandise initially led fans to discover a network of fictitious, in-game websites that describe an "Orwellian picture of the United States circa the year 2022".[113] Before Year Zero's release, unreleased songs from the album were found on USB drives hidden at Nine Inch Nails concert venues in Lisbon and Barcelona, as part of the alternate reality game.[114] Fan participation in the alternate reality game caught the attention of media outlets such as USA Today and Billboard, who have cited fan-site The NIN Hotline, forum Echoing the Sound, fan club The Spiral, and NinWiki as sources for new discoveries.[115][116]

The album's first single, "Survivalism", and other tracks from Year Zero were released as multitrack audio files for fans to remix.[117] A remix album titled Year Zero Remixed was later released, containing remixes from Year Zero by other artists.[118] The remix album was Nine Inch Nails' final release on a major record label for over five years, as the act had completed its contractual obligation to Interscope Records and did not renew its contract.[119] The remix album was accompanied by an interactive remix site with multitrack downloads and the ability to post remixes.[120]

Reznor planned a film adaption of the album[121] and noted Year Zero as "part of a bigger picture of a number of things I'm working on. Essentially, I wrote the soundtrack to a movie that doesn't exist."[110] The project moved into the television medium because of high costs for Year Zero as a film, then Reznor found American film producer Lawrence Bender and met with writers.[122] On August 10, 2007, Reznor announced that they would be taking the concept to television networks in an attempt to secure a deal: "We're about to pitch it to the network, so we're a couple of weeks away from meeting all of the main people, and we'll see what happens."[123] Since first announcing his plans for a television series, progress slowed, reportedly due to the 20072008 Writer's Guild strike, but it nevertheless continued.[124] As of 2010 the resultant miniseries, also named Year Zero, was in development with HBO and BBC Worldwide Productions, with the screenplay and script written by Reznor and Carnivale writer Daniel Knauf.[125]

Ghosts IIV and The Slip (2008)

A man sitting in front of a field of craggy rocks. Reznor in 2008

In February 2008, Reznor posted a news update on the Nine Inch Nails website entitled "2 weeks." On March 2, Ghosts IIV (the first release on The Null Corporation label), a 36-track instrumental album, became available via the band's official website. Ghosts IIV was made available in a number of different formats and forms, ranging from a free download of the first volume, to a $300 Ultra-Deluxe limited edition package. All 2,500 copies of the $300 package sold out in three days.[126] The album is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike licence.[127][128] The album was created improvisationally over a 10-week period and contributors included Atticus Ross, Alan Moulder, Alessandro Cortini, Adrian Belew, and Brian Viglione.[129]

Similar to the announcement that ultimately led to the release of Ghosts IIV, a post on the band's website in April 2008 read "2 weeks!"[130] On May 5, Nine Inch Nails released The Slip via its website without any advertisement or promotion.[131] The album was made available for download free of charge with a message from Reznor, "this one's on me,"[132] protected under the same Creative Commons licence as Ghosts, and has seen individual downloads surpassing 1.4million.[133] The Slip has since been released on CD as a limited edition set of 250,000.

Since the release of Ghosts IIV and The Slip, a 25-date tour titled Lights in the Sky, was announced in several North American cities,[134] and was later expanded to include several more North American dates as well as dates in South America. Cortini and Josh Freese returned as members from the previous tour, while Robin Finck rejoined the band and Justin Meldal-Johnsen was added on bass guitar.[135] Freese and Cortini left the live band, but it became a quartet with the addition of Ilan Rubin on drums.[136][137]

On January 7, 2009, Reznor uploaded unedited HD-quality footage from three shows as a download of over 400 GB via BitTorrent.[138] In an immediate response, a fan organization known as This One Is On Us quickly downloaded the data and had begun to assemble the footage alongside its own video recordings to create a professional 3-part digital film, followed by a physical release created "by fans for fans".[139] This tour documentary became collectively known as Another Version of the Truth and was released throughout late December 2009 to February 2010 via three formats: DVD, Blu-ray Disc and BitTorrent. To date, the group and the project has received significant attention from media outlets such as USA Today,[140] Rolling Stone,[141] Techdirt and Pitchfork TV,[142] and holds the support of both Reznor and the fan community with theatrical screenings being held all over the world.[143] Nine Inch Nails art director and webmaster Rob Sheridan noted on the band's official website:

This is yet another example of a devoted fanbase and a policy of openness combining to fill in blanks left by old media barriers. The entire NIN camp is absolutely thrilled that treating our fans with respect and nurturing their creativity has led to such an overwhelming outpour of incredible content, and that we now have such a high quality souvenir from our most ambitious tour ever.[144]

Nine Inch Nails Revenge, an iPhone/iPod touch-exclusive rhythm game developed by Tapulous, was released on March 8, 2009 (five months after the company announced the development of the game). This installment in the Tap Tap video game franchise was themed after Nine Inch Nails, and included tracks from Ghosts IIV and The Slip.[145][146] Portions of the album Ghosts I-IV were also used in making of the soundtrack for the documentary Citizenfour.[147]

Wave Goodbye tour and second hiatus (20092012)

Reznor performing at the Music Box in Hollywood on September 8, 2009

In February 2009, Reznor posted his thoughts about the future of Nine Inch Nails on his official website, stating that "I've been thinking for some time now it's time to make NIN disappear for a while."[148] Reznor since clarified that he "isn't done creating music under the moniker, but that Nine Inch Nails is done touring for the foreseeable future."[149][150] The "Wave Goodbye" tour concluded on September 10, 2009, at the Wiltern Theater in Los Angeles.[151] Reznor subsequently released two tracks under the Nine Inch Nails moniker: the theme song for the film Tetsuo: The Bullet Man,[152] and a cover of U2's "Zoo Station", included in the Achtung Baby tribute album AHK-toong BAY-bi Covered.

In 2009 Reznor married Mariqueen Maandig,[153][154] and formed a project with Maandig and Atticus Ross dubbed How to Destroy Angels. Its first release, a six-track self-titled EP, was made available for free download in June 2010. Reznor's next collaboration with Ross was co-writing and producing the official score for David Fincher's 2010 film, The Social Network. Reznor and Ross received two awards for the score, a 2010 Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score for a Motion Picture,[155] and a 2010 Oscar for Best Original Score.[156] Reznor and Ross again collaborated with Fincher for the official score the American adaptation of the novel The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, released in December 2011, and then again on Fincher's 2014 film Gone Girl [157]

In July 2012 Reznor teamed up with video game developer Treyarch to compose the theme music for Call of Duty: Black Ops II.[158] Later that year Reznor again worked with Atticus Ross along with Alessandro Cortini on a remix of the song "Destroyer" by Telepathe.[159] Reznor also appeared in a documentary called "Sound City" directed by Dave Grohl,[160] in addition to co-writing and performing the song "Mantra" with Grohl and Josh Homme.[161] This led to further collaboration with Reznor and Homme on the 2013 album from Queens of the Stone Age titled ... Like Clockwork.[162] Reznor contributed vocals and drum programing to the song "Kalopsia" and vocals on "Fairweather Friends" along with Elton John on piano and vocals.[163] In October a project with Dr. Dre and Beats Electronics was announced that Reznor wrote was "probably not what you're expecting [from me]".[164] The project was named "Daisy"; a digital music service was announced in January 2013.[165] It was until January 2014 that the service was fully launched, with Reznor serving as chief creative officer.[166]

Return to touring and Hesitation Marks (20122015)

In an interview with BBC Radio 1, Reznor indicated that he would be writing for the majority of 2012 with Nine Inch Nails "in mind".[167] Reznor eventually confirmed that he was working on new Nine Inch Nails material and might be performing live again.[168][169][170] In February 2013, Reznor announced the return of Nine Inch Nails and revealed the Twenty Thirteen Tour. He also revealed that the new lineup of the band would include Eric Avery of Jane's Addiction, Adrian Belew of King Crimson, and Josh Eustis of Telefon Tel Aviv, as well as returning members Alessandro Cortini and Ilan Rubin.[171] However, both Avery and Belew would quit the touring band before performances commenced,[172][173] with former member Robin Finck returning in their place.[174][175]

By May 28 a new Nine Inch Nails album was complete.[176][177][178] Released September 3, Hesitation Marks incorporated rhythms reminiscent of earlier releases, but was more expansive and theatrical. In addition to the recently departed Adrian Belew, Reznor employed bassist Pino Palladino along with Todd Rundgren and Fleetwood Mac's Lindsey Buckingham to achieve various art-rock elements.[179]

The band performing at Mediolanum Forum in Milan in 2013, (from left to right): drummer Ilan Rubin, bassist Joshua Eustis, singer Trent Reznor, guitarist Robin Finck and keyboardist Alessandro Cortini.

The album produced three singles, all released prior to that of the album itself. "Came Back Haunted" was released on June 6,[180] with an accompanying music video bearing an epileptic seizure warning.[181] The second single, "Copy of A", was released on August 12 free of charge to US and UK Amazon.com account holders.[182] "Everything" was the third and final single, recorded during sessions for the Nine Inch Nails greatest hits album. The sessions gave way to more songs that ended up yielding the entire album.[183]

In July the Twenty Thirteen Tour was underway, beginning with a slew of festival appearances that included the Fuji Rock Festival, and the Pukkelpop, Hockenheim, Germany's Rock'n'Heim and the Reading and Leeds festivals in August.[184][185] The Tension 2013 North American leg of the tour ran from September to November and added Palladino, Lisa Fischer and Sharlotte Gibson to the lineup with Godspeed You! Black Emperor and Explosions in the Sky as opening acts.[186][187] This leg of the tour was documented and released in the spring as Nine Inch Nails Tension 2013.[188]

In 2014 the band extended its tour worldwide as a four-piece. The new lineup included previous collaborators, Ilan Rubin, Alessandro Cortini, and Robin Finck.[189][190] The band was joined by Queens of the Stone Age for the Australia and New Zealand tour, during which a nightly coin toss determined who opened.[191] The tour closed in Europe with supporting synth-pop act Cold Cave.[192]

After a month-long break, Nine Inch Nails again hit the road on a joint tour with Soundgarden. The 23-day journey extended throughout the continental US, with experimental hip-hop group Death Grips scheduled to open most of the shows.[193] Two weeks into the tour, Death Grips announced its breakup and cancelled all subsequent live shows.[194] Oneohtrix Point Never, The Dillinger Escape Plan and Cold Cave each replaced Death Grips separately for the remainder of the tour.[195]

In 2014, its first year of eligibility,[196] Nine Inch Nails was nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with 14 other candidates.[197] While they were not inducted that year, the band placed second in the 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees Fan Vote.[198] In 2015, Nine Inch Nails was once again nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[199] However, they once again did not get inducted.

In June 2015, Nine Inch Nails released instrumental versions of The Fragile and With Teeth to stream exclusively on Apple Music, a service of which Reznor is chief creative director.[200] In an interview promoting the service, Reznor mentioned he has started "messing around with some things" in regards to a new Nine Inch Nails album, stating "It's not a record I'm trying to finish in a month. It's more just feeling around in the dark and seeing what sounds interesting".[201] In December 2015, Reznor reported that "Nine Inch Nails will return in 2016".[202]

Not the Actual Events, Add Violence, and Bad Witch (2016present)

In October 2016, in response to a fan's question about the lack of new Nine Inch Nails music, Reznor responded with "2016 is not over yet".[203] In December 2016, Reznor commented on his statement regarding Nine Inch Nails' return by the end of the year: "Those words did come out of my mouth, didn't they? ... Just wait and see what happens."[204] Three days later, Reznor announced an EP titled Not the Actual Events,[205] along with reissues of Broken, The Downward Spiral, and The Fragile, with subsequent reissues of With Teeth, Year Zero, and The Slip to be released later in 2017, these plans however fell through.[206] Also announced was The Fragile: Deviations 1, which comprised 37 instrumental, alternate and unreleased tracks, many of which have never been heard before anywhere.[207][208] Not the Actual Events was released on December 23, 2016, with fans who pre-ordered it receiving their download links one day earlier.[209][210] Atticus Ross was also revealed to be an official full-time member of the band, the first member other than Reznor to be added to the band.[211]

In early 2017, the band announced three headlining festival dates in North America. In January 2017, the band announced that it would be performing at the Panorama Music Festival in New York on July 30.[212] On March 21, the band announced on their official Facebook page that it would be headlining Day 3 of FYF Fest in Los Angeles on July 23. In the same post, the band also announced its 2017 touring lineup, which included Reznor and Ross joined by the band's 2014 touring lineup, Robin Finck, Alessandro Cortini, and Ilan Rubin.

In June 2017, in an email that was issued out to customers waiting on delayed vinyl orders, Reznor confirmed that Not the Actual Events would actually make up the first part of a trilogy of EPs, with the second installment Add Violence being released on July 21[213] and the third and final EP of the trilogy to follow in 2018.[214][215][216] The single "Less Than" was released a week prior to the second EP's release.[217]

Also in 2017, the pair were tasked to score the upcoming Ken Burns series The Vietnam War, and provide both original music and a compilation soundtrack of popular songs. Their score, which was released on September 15, 2017, included original compositions, and it also includes reworked pieces from other Nine Inch Nails songs and their award-winning scores forThe Social NetworkandThe Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.[218]

In May 2018, the band revealed its ninth studio album,[219] entitled Bad Witch, which was released on June 22, 2018.[220] The band also announced the "Cold and Black and Infinite North America 2018 Tour", where it toured with The Jesus and Mary Chain.[221][222] To prevent ticket scalping, the band took the unusual step of only selling physical tickets that had to be purchased at the venue prior to the shows.[223] Reznor stated of the decision "The promise of a world made better by computers and online connectivity has failed us in many ways, particularly when it comes to ticketing. Everything about the process sucks and everyone loses except the reseller. We've decided to try something different that will also likely suck, but in a different way."[223]

On June 25, 2019, The New York Times Magazine listed Nine Inch Nails among hundreds of artists whose material was reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire.[224]

Music and lyrics

Nine Inch Nails has been described as incorporating alternative rock,[225][226][227] industrial rock,[228][229][230][231] industrial dance,[4] industrial,[232][233][4] electro-industrial,[234] industrial metal,[235][236][237] and electronic rock.[238][239][240] AllMusic's Steve Huey states that "Nine Inch Nails were the most popular industrial group ever and were largely responsible for bringing the music to a mass audience".[4] Reznor has never referred to his own work as industrial music, but admits to borrowing techniques from such early industrial bands as Throbbing Gristle and Test Dept.[12] Despite the disparity between those artists initially operating under the term "industrial" and Nine Inch Nails, it has become common in journalistic descriptions of Reznor's body of work to describe it as such. Reznor acknowledged in Spin magazine that "Down in It" was influenced by early Skinny Puppy, particularly the band's song "Dig It"; other songs from Pretty Hate Machine and With Teeth have been described as synth-pop.[241][242][1]:35 Reviewing The Fragile, critic Steve Cooper noted that the album juxtaposes widely varied genres, such as solo piano in "The Frail" and drum and bass elements in "Starfuckers, Inc."[243] Ambient music has been featured in some of Nine Inch Nails' music, including on Ghosts IIV (which is specifically dark ambient),[244] Hesitation Marks,[245] The Downward Spiral,[246] The Slip,[247] and The Fragile.[233]

Songs such as "Wish", and "The Day the World Went Away" exhibit terraced dynamics. Reznor's singing follows a similar pattern, frequently moving from whispers to screams. He also has used software to alter his voice in several songs, as evident in "Starfuckers, Inc." and "Burn". The band's music also occasionally contains complex time signatures, notably in "The Collector", from With Teeth, and concert favorite "March of the Pigs".[98][248] Reznor uses noise and distortion in his song arrangements, and incorporates dissonance with chromatic melody and/or harmony.[249] These techniques are all used in the song "Hurt", which contains a highly dissonant tritone played on guitar during the verses, a B5#11, emphasized when Reznor sings the eleventh note on the word "I" every time the B/E# dyad is played.[250] "Closer" concludes with a chromatic piano motif: The melody is debuted during the second verse of "Piggy" on organ, then reappears in power chords at drop D tuning throughout the chorus of "Heresy", while an inverted (ascending) version is used throughout "A Warm Place", and then recurs in its original state for the final time on "The Downward Spiral".[98] On The Fragile, Reznor revisits this technique of repeating a motif multiple times throughout different songs, either on a different musical instrument, with a transposed harmony, or in an altered tempo.[251] Many of the songs on Year Zero contain an extended instrumental ending, which encompasses the entire second half of the three-minute long "The Great Destroyer". Allmusic's review described the album's laptop-mixed sound: "guitars squall against glitches, beeps, pops, and blotches of blurry sonic attacks. Percussion looms large, distorted, organic, looped, screwed, spindled and broken."[252]

Lyrical themes found in Nine Inch Nails songs are largely concerned with dark explorations of the self ranging from religion, greed, fame, lust, addiction, self-deception, aging, regret, nihilism,[253] and occasionally politics, with the latter topic often being scrutinized in Year Zero.[111] Three of Nine Inch Nails' recordings are concept albums: The Downward Spiral, follow-up The Fragile, and the aforementioned Year Zero. With Teeth (under the working title Bleedthrough) was to be a concept album about an endless dream occurring in reality, but Reznor eventually took this idea out of the record.[254]

Influences

Nine Inch Nails' earliest influences include Ministry and Skinny Puppy, which helped shape 1989's Pretty Hate Machine.[4] The album's liner notes also paid tribute to the hip-hop group Public Enemy and Prince.[255] Another large influence on the band's sound is Gary Numan, which is evident as Reznor once said that "after hearing 'Cars' I knew I wanted to make music with synthesizers".[256] The 2005 single "Only" exemplifies the disco-style beats and synthesizers drawn from Numan's persuasion.[255] Other artists of significance to Nine Inch Nails encompass late 70s and 80s acts such as Queen, Devo,[257] Joy Division, Adam Ant,[255] and Soft Cell.[258]

Reznor has toured with some of his influences, including a brief tour opening for Skinny Puppy in 1988.[4][259] In 1995, Nine Inch Nails went on tour with David Bowie, who, along with Pink Floyd, had been a significant influence on The Downward Spiral.[4]

Legacy

Nine Inch Nails has influenced many newer artists, which according to Reznor range from "generic imitations" dating from his initial success to younger bands echoing his style in a "truer, less imitative way".[260] Following the release of The Downward Spiral, mainstream artists began to take notice of Nine Inch Nails' influence: David Bowie compared Reznor's impact to that of The Velvet Underground.[261] Bob Ezrin, producer for Pink Floyd, Kiss, Alice Cooper, and Peter Gabriel, described Reznor in 2007 as a "true visionary" and advised aspiring artists to take note of his no-compromise attitude.[262] Nine Inch Nails has been credited by music journalists for popularizing industrial music, despite ambivalence from Reznor.[4][263]

The act has received four awards from 25 nominations, including two Grammy Awards for the songs "Wish" and "Happiness in Slavery" in 1993 and 1996 respectively.[264] Nine Inch Nails have received two Kerrang! Awards; one of them being the Kerrang! Icon in 2006, honoring the band's overall contributions since 1988 and long-standing influence on rock music.[265][266] The band has also received nine nominations from the MTV Video Music Awards for several of its videos, including two nominations for the "Closer" music video and five nominations for "The Perfect Drug" music video, including Video of the Year.[264]

In 1997, Reznor appeared in Time magazine's list of the year's most influential people, and Spin described him as "the most vital artist in music".[267] The Recording Industry Association of America certified sales for 10.5 million units of the band's albums in the United States,[268] which accounted for roughly half of the band's reported sales worldwide at that time.[269] In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine placed The Downward Spiral at No.200 in a 2003 list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time,[270] and by the following year ranked Nine Inch Nails at No.94 in their The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time list.[261]

In 2019, Reznor and Ross received songwriting and production credits for the number-one single "Old Town Road" by Lil Nas X, which sampled their track "34 Ghosts IV" from Ghosts I-IV.[271] "Old Town Road" broke the record for most consecutive weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100.[272] As producers for the song, Reznor and Ross garnered a CMA Award nomination for the 'Musical Event Of The Year' award, along with Lil Nas X, featured artist Billy Ray Cyrus and producer YoungKio.[273]

Live performances

Main article: Nine Inch Nails live performances See also: List of Nine Inch Nails tours and List of Nine Inch Nails band members Three men performing on stage, one plays guitar, another sings into a microphone, and the other plays bass. Nine Inch Nails live on tour in 2005

Until Atticus Ross joined in 2016, Reznor was the sole official member of Nine Inch Nails. However, Reznor typically forms a backing group of musicians to perform the songs in a live setting. This live band, also known as Nine Inch Nails, rearranges the band's studio catalog and creates a different sound than that of Reznor's studio recordings.[274][275] Band members have occasionally been invited to participate in the recording process, but creative control within the studio has always been exclusively with Reznor.[276]

The Tapeworm project was created in 1995 as a Nine Inch Nails side-project between Reznor and various live-band members as a more "democratic" creative environment.[277][278] The band initially included live band members Danny Lohner and Charlie Clouser, but eventually expanded to include other frequent Nine Inch Nails contributors Josh Freese, Atticus Ross, and Alan Moulder.[279][280] However, after 9 years of studio sessions, no material was ever officially released from the group, and it was confirmed to be no longer active in 2005.[281]

The lineup of the live band had a tendency to change drastically between major tours: aside from Reznor remaining on lead vocals, keyboards and guitar, no member of the live band have remained constant since its formation. Reznor cited the long gestation period between studio albums as part of the reason for these frequent personnel changes,[282] as well as his desire for fresh interpretations of his music.[283]

Corporate disputes

Reznor is an outspoken critic of the music industry, particularly the influence that music businesses have exerted upon his creative freedom. Nine Inch Nails has clashed with several music industry corporations, culminating in Reznor's decision to proceed as an independent artist who does not employ the financial backing of the music industry to fund his creative output.[284]

TVT Records

In the early 1990s, Nine Inch Nails was involved in a much-publicized feud with TVT Records, the first record label to sign the band. Reznor objected to the label's attempted interference with his intellectual property.[13] Ultimately, Nine Inch Nails entered into a joint venture with Interscope Records in which Reznor forfeited a portion of his publishing rights to TVT Music in exchange for the freedom of having his own Nothing Records imprint.[285] In 2005, Reznor sued his former friend and manager John Malm, co-founder of Nothing, for fraud, breach of contract and fiduciary duty, and other claims.[286] Their relationship was formally severed in a New York courtroom, with damages awarded to Reznor in excess of $3 million.[287]

At the behest of Prudential Securities bankruptcy proceedings, TVT put the rights to Reznor's recordings for the label on auction in 2005. This offer included the whole TVT catalog, including Pretty Hate Machine, and a percentage of royalties from Reznor's song publishing company, Leaving Hope Music/TVT Music. Rykodisc, which did not win the auction but was able to license the rights from Prudential, reissued the out-of-print Pretty Hate Machine CD on November 22, 2005.[288] Ryko also reissued the "Head Like a Hole" CD and a vinyl edition of Pretty Hate Machine in 2006. The label considered releasing a deluxe edition, just as Interscope had done for The Downward Spiral. They were influenced by Reznor and liked the idea, but did not want to pay him for the album and the idea was scrapped.[289]

Universal Music Group

In May 2007, Reznor made a post on the official Nine Inch Nails website skeptical of Universal Music Group (parent company of Nine Inch Nails' record label, Interscope Records) for its pricing and distribution plans for Year Zero.[290] He labeled the company's retail pricing of Year Zero in Australia as "ABSURD", concluding that "as a reward for being a 'true fan' you get ripped off". Reznor went on to say that he hated Interscope, and in later years the "climate" of record labels may have an increasingly ambivalent impact on consumers who buy music.[291] Reznor's post, specifically his criticism of the recording industry at large, elicited considerable media attention.[292] In September 2007, Reznor continued his attack on UMG at a concert in Australia, urging fans there to "steal" his music online instead of purchasing it legally.[293] Reznor went on to encourage the crowd to "steal and steal and steal some more and give it to all your friends and keep on stealing".[294]

Reznor announced on October 8, 2007, that Nine Inch Nails had fulfilled its contractual commitments to Interscope Records and was now free to proceed as a "totally free agent, free of any recording contract with any label".[295] Reznor also speculated that he would release the next Nine Inch Nails album online in a similar fashion to The Inevitable Rise and Liberation of NiggyTardust!, which he produced.[296] Reznor later released the first nine tracks of Ghosts IIV and the entirety of The Slip in 2008 for free download.

In another post on his website, Reznor again openly criticized Universal Music Group for preventing him from launching an official interactive fan remix website. Universal declined to host the site just days before its scheduled launch, citing the potential "accusation", in Reznor's words, "that they are sponsoring the same technical violation of copyright they are suing [other media companies] for".[297] Reznor wrote in response that he was "challenged at the last second to find a way of bringing this idea to life without getting splashed by the urine as these media companies piss all over each other's feet".[298] Despite these obstacles, the remix website was launched in November 2007.

Other corporations

Nine Inch Nails was scheduled to perform at the 2005 MTV Movie Awards, but withdrew from the show due to a disagreement with the network over the use of an unaltered image of George W. Bush as a backdrop to the band's performance of "The Hand That Feeds". Soon afterwards, Reznor wrote on his official website: "Apparently, the image of our president is as offensive to MTV as it is to me."[287] MTV replied that it respected Reznor's point of view, but was "uncomfortable" with the performance being "built around partisan political statements". A performance by Foo Fighters replaced Nine Inch Nails' time slot on the show.[299] During the Lights in the Sky tour in 2008, some performances of "The Hand that Feeds" had the image of Bush on a video screen behind the band. At some gigs leading up to the election, the face of Bush slowly morphed during the song into the face of John McCain.

In 2006, after being alerted by a fan website, Reznor issued a cease and desist to Fox News Channel for using three songs from The Fragile on air without permission. The songs "La Mer", "The Great Below", and "The Mark Has Been Made" appeared in an episode of War Stories with Oliver North detailing the battle of Iwo Jima.[300] A post appeared on Reznor's blog, which read: "Thanks for the Fox News heads-up. A cease and desist has been issued. FUCK Fox Fucking News."[301]

As part of the alternate reality game which accompanied the release of Year Zero, three tracks from the album were intentionally "leaked" prior to their official release at a number of Nine Inch Nails concerts on USB flash drives.[114] The high-quality audio files quickly circulated the internet, and owners of websites hosting the files soon received cease and desist orders from the Recording Industry Association of America, despite the fact that the viral campaign, and the use of USB drives, was sanctioned by Nine Inch Nails' record label.[302] The source that broke the story was quoted as saying, "These fucking idiots are going after a campaign that the label signed off on."[302]

The music of Nine Inch Nails has reportedly been used by the U.S. military as music torture to break down the resolve of detainees.[303] Reznor objected to the use of his music in this way with the following message on the front page of the Nine Inch Nails website: "It's difficult for me to imagine anything more profoundly insulting, demeaning and enraging than discovering music you've put your heart and soul into creating has been used for purposes of torture. If there are any legal options that can be realistically taken they will be aggressively pursued, with any potential monetary gains donated to human rights charities. Thank GOD this country has appeared to side with reason and we can put the Bush administration's reign of power, greed, lawlessness and madness behind us."[304]

Aside from disagreements over the usage of Nine Inch Nails material, some corporations have dismissed content due to perceived obscenity. In 2009, Apple rejected an update to Nine Inch Nails' iPhone application, NIN: Access, because it found The Downward Spiral to contain "offensive or obscene content", referring to the lyrical content.[305][306] Reznor criticized their decision, citing the audio was also available through the iTunes application.[306]

A similar incident involving digital content distribution occurred in 2013 when Nine Inch Nails re-released the original 1993 film Broken on Vimeo. Within hours of launch, the video was removed due to a terms of service violation on material that "harass, incite hatred or depict excessive violence".[307][308]

Band members

Main article: List of Nine Inch Nails band members

Official members

  • Trent Reznor lead vocals, guitar, bass, keyboards, synthesizers, piano, programming, percussion (1988present)
  • Atticus Ross keyboards, synthesizers, programming, backing vocals (2016present)

Additional touring line-up

  • Robin Finck guitar, synthesizers, keyboards, lap steel, violin, backing vocals (19941995, 19992000, 2008present)
  • Alessandro Cortini keyboards, synthesizers, bass, guitar, backing vocals (20042008, 2013present)
  • Ilan Rubin drums, percussion, bass, guitar, cello, keyboards, backing vocals (2009present)

Discography

Main articles: Nine Inch Nails discography and List of songs recorded by Nine Inch Nails
  • Pretty Hate Machine (1989)
  • The Downward Spiral (1994)
  • The Fragile (1999)
  • With Teeth (2005)
  • Year Zero (2007)
  • Ghosts IIV (2008)
  • The Slip (2008)
  • Hesitation Marks (2013)
  • Bad Witch (2018)

Tours

  • Pretty Hate Machine Tour Series (19881991)
  • Self Destruct Tour (19941996)
  • Fragility Tour (19992000)
  • Live: With Teeth Tour (20052006)
  • Performance 2007 Tour (2007)
  • Lights in the Sky Tour (2008)
  • Wave Goodbye Tour (2009)
  • Twenty Thirteen Tour (20132014)
  • I Can't Seem to Wake Up (2017)
  • Cold and Black and Infinite (2018)

Awards

For a more comprehensive list, see List of awards and nominations received by Nine Inch Nails.

Nine Inch Nails has been nominated for 13 Grammy Awards and has won awards on two occasionsfor "Wish" in 1992 and "Happiness in Slavery" in 1995:

Year Nominee / work Award Result 1992 "Wish" Best Metal Performance[44] Won 1995 The Downward Spiral Best Alternative Music Performance[44] Nominated 1995 "Happiness in Slavery" (from Woodstock '94 compilation) Best Metal Performance[44] Won 1996 "Hurt" Best Rock Song[44] Nominated 1997 "The Perfect Drug" Best Hard Rock Performance[44] Nominated 1999 The Fragile Best Alternative Music Album[44] Nominated 1999 "Starfuckers, Inc." Best Metal Performance[44] Nominated 2000 "Into the Void" Best Male Rock Vocal Performance[44] Nominated 2005 "The Hand That Feeds" Best Hard Rock Performance[309] Nominated 2006 "Every Day is Exactly the Same" Best Hard Rock Performance[310] Nominated 2009 "34 Ghosts IV" Best Rock Instrumental Performance[311] Nominated 2009 Ghosts I-IV Best Boxed Set or Limited Edition Package[311] Nominated 2013 Hesitation Marks Best Alternative Music Album[312] Nominated

References

Citations

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"Trent Reznor on the return of Nine Inch Nails: "2016 is not over yet"". Consequence of Sound. Archived from the original on December 22, 2016. Retrieved December 28, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "Trent Reznor Talks New Nine Inch Nails, Boundary-Pushing Soundtracks". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on December 18, 2016. Retrieved December 17, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "Nine Inch Nails on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on April 4, 2018. Retrieved December 16, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "All Nine Inch Nails Records Being Reissued On Vinyl nine inch nails". nine inch nails. December 16, 2016. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved December 17, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "The Fragile: Deviations 1 Limited Edition 4X Vinyl Available for Preorder Now nine inch nails". nine inch nails. December 16, 2016. Archived from the original on December 18, 2016. Retrieved December 17, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "Nine Inch Nails Plan 'Two New Major Works' for 2017". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on June 20, 2017. Retrieved June 19, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "NOT THE ACTUAL EVENTS BRAND NEW NINE INCH NAILS DIGITAL + PHYSICAL COMPONENT". Nine Inch Nails. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved December 16, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "Trent Reznor on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on December 18, 2016. Retrieved December 16, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) ^ "Nine Inch Nails Are Releasing a New EP Next Week Oh Yeah, and Atticus Ross Is an 'Official' Member Now". December 16, 2016. Archived from the original on February 5, 2017. 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Bibliography

  • Carr, Daphne (2011). Nine Inch Nails' Pretty Hate Machine. Bloomsbury Publishing USA. ISBN9781441186379.
  • Huxley, Martin (September 1997). Nine Inch Nails: Self Destruct. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN0-312-15612-X via the Internet Archive.

External links

Nine Inch Nailsat Wikipedia's sister projects
  • Media from Wikimedia Commons
  • Quotations from Wikiquote
  • Data from Wikidata
  • Official website Edit this at Wikidata
  • Nine Inch Nails at Curlie
  • v
  • t
  • e
Nine Inch Nails
  • Trent Reznor
  • Atticus Ross
Studio albums
  • Pretty Hate Machine
  • The Downward Spiral
  • The Fragile
  • With Teeth
  • Year Zero
  • Ghosts IIV
  • The Slip
  • Hesitation Marks
  • Bad Witch
Extended plays
  • Broken
  • Fixed
  • Live 2013 EP
  • Remix 2014 EP
  • Not the Actual Events
  • Add Violence
Live releases
  • Closure
  • And All That Could Have Been
  • Beside You in Time
Remix albums
  • Further Down the Spiral
  • Things Falling Apart
  • Year Zero Remixed
Box sets
  • Halo IIV
Singles
  • "Down in It"
  • "Head Like a Hole"
  • "Sin"
  • "March of the Pigs"
  • "Closer"
  • "The Perfect Drug"
  • "The Day the World Went Away"
  • "We're in This Together"
  • "Into the Void"
  • "The Hand That Feeds"
  • "Only"
  • "Every Day Is Exactly the Same"
  • "Survivalism"
  • "Capital G"
  • "Discipline"
  • "Came Back Haunted"
  • "Copy of a"
  • "Everything"
  • "Less Than"
  • "God Break Down the Door"
Promotional singles
  • "Happiness in Slavery"
  • "Wish"
  • "Burn"
  • "Piggy"
  • "Hurt"
  • "Starfuckers, Inc."
  • "Deep"
Other songs
  • "Something I Can Never Have"
  • "Gave Up"
  • "Mr. Self Destruct"
  • "Just Like You Imagined"
  • "All the Love in the World"
Compilations
  • Lights in the Sky: Over North America 2008 Tour Sampler
  • NINJA 2009 Tour Sampler
  • The Fragile: Deviations 1
Games
  • Quake
  • Year Zero
  • Nine Inch Nails Revenge
Tours
  • Pretty Hate Machine Tour Series
  • Self-Destruct
  • Dissonance
  • Fragility
  • Live: With Teeth
  • Performance 2007
  • Wave Goodbye
  • Twenty Thirteen Tour
Current touring members
  • Robin Finck
  • Alessandro Cortini
  • Ilan Rubin
Former touring membersGuitarists
  • Richard Patrick
  • Danny Lohner
  • Jeordie White
  • Aaron North
  • Rich Fownes
  • Justin Meldal-Johnsen
  • Joshua Eustis
  • Pino Palladino
  • Eric Avery
  • Adrian Belew
Drummers
  • Jeff Ward
  • Chris Vrenna
  • Jerome Dillon
  • Josh Freese
  • Alex Carapetis
Keyboardists
  • James Woolley
  • Charlie Clouser
Backing vocalists
  • Lisa Fischer
RelatedBands
  • Option 30
  • The Innocent
  • Exotic Birds
  • Lucky Pierre
  • Prick
  • Pigface
  • Tapeworm
  • Marilyn Manson
  • How to Destroy Angels
  • Filter
  • Jane's Addiction
  • Queens of the Stone Age
People
  • Mariqueen Maandig
  • John Malm Jr.
  • Marilyn Manson
  • Kevin McMahon
  • Russell Mills
  • Rob Sheridan
  • Gary Talpas
Albums and songs
  • Natural Born Killers
  • Lost Highway
  • "Old Town Road"
  • "On a Roll"
  • Pretty Eight Machine
  • Radiant Decay
  • Recoiled
Articles
  • Discography
    • Songs recorded
    • Trent Reznor discography
  • Awards and nominations
  • Band members
  • Live performances
    • Concert tours
  • Nothing Records
  • The Null Corporation
  • Broken (film)
  • Beats Music
  • "I'm Afraid of Americans"
  • Another Version of the Truth
  • Wikipedia book Book
  • Category Category
  • v
  • t
  • e
Nothing Records
  • Discography
  • Trent Reznor
  • John Malm Jr.
  • The Null Corporation

Authority control Edit this at Wikidata
  • BNF: cb13939751r (data)
  • GND: 10295338-7
  • ISNI: 0000 0001 2149 3471
  • LCCN: no96005790
  • MusicBrainz: b7ffd2af-418f-4be2-bdd1-22f8b48613da
  • NKC: xx0009194
  • NLA-person: 1459577
  • SUDOC: 086227378
  • VIAF: 121137238
  • WorldCat Identities (via VIAF): 121137238
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nine_Inch_Nails&oldid=914612115"

Talk:The Fragile (Nine Inch Nails album)
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1

Scigatt 08:05, 15 April 2006 (UTC) Well, to me, this article is obviously not NPOV.

  • Huh? Then why did you put a POV tag on it? I think you mean POV, not NPOV, in your above statement. Please provide some examples, as I can't find any POV material in this article. I'll remove the tag in seven days unless anyone objects. --TonySt 14:50, 16 April 2006 (UTC)

""The Fragile" is Reznor's most sophisticated work, requiring the listener to consider the entire album instead of being a collection of singles and b-sides. Several tracks contain no vocals whatsoever, but are instead symphonic soundscapes that flow in and out of each other, like streaking, mixed paints on a canvas.

That is not to say that Reznor's style "goes soft" on this album. This is still adolescent angst at its best, filled with nihilistic disappointment, rage, and sorrow. The difference is that this album is, in many ways, the most richly detailed and beautiful mosaic for such subject matter. There are more pauses amidst the noise in this album, and the artist's struggles seem that much more painfully rendered here."

The Fragile: Deviations 1 is mentioned as "consists of a one-off 4xLP pressing, available through pre-orders only." With that pre-order it was also immediately made available as an MP3/wave download. Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.24.221.98 (talk) 04:56, 20 July 2017 (UTC)

  • just one man's opinion, but the preceding two paragraphs sound more like a album review than an encyclopedic entry, lending itself more to a POV than a critical analysis. --anon
    • Good point. Let me see if I can clean up the article... --TonySt 01:00, 25 April 2006 (UTC)

digipack

should it be mentioned that it's a nice double digipack? Kansaikiwi 06:07, 15 June 2006 (UTC)

quotations

There's too many quotes in the beginning of this article. I think one or both ought to be removed. --Raid0422 20:17, 3 November 2006 (UTC)

"Hidden" track

Between tracks 4+5 on the 2nd disc, Reznor can be heard faintly saying something like I'm getting closer/I'm getting closer all the time as the clock on my CD player ticks back a minus number (approx. 15 seconds). You need to start playing from the start of track 4, and not skip back from track 5. Lugnuts 11:04, 26 February 2007 (UTC)

Yes. That's where "10 Miles High" would go if it were still on the album.-ABigBlackMan (talk) 12:50, 15 September 2008 (UTC)

Album Cover Meaning?

Are there any news stories out there about the cover art? The top portion looks like a pixelized waterfall, and I am very curious of to the origin and meaning. Steveprutz 20:36, 12 April 2007 (UTC)

What I see on the cover is a hand holding a gun and pointing at the head (and a red background). the hand is on the left and i can see blurred fingers. the head is on the right and there is a blurred eye under the nin logo... --79.184.167.226 17:49, 1 December 2007 (UTC)

The Fragile (The Song)

I have a song called The Fragile (Unplugged) in my iTunes, and I was wondering if anyone could tell me if this is a cover of the song, or if Trent Reznor actually did do an acoustic version of The Fragile.

 This is probably the "Still" version of "The Fragile". See Still_(Nine_Inch_Nails_album). Steveprutz 16:07, 19 April 2007 (UTC)

Vinyl vs CD

I think a discussion about the vinyl and CD editions is warranted; I.E. how songs are edited, and the different track listings.

yes! please someone who has this knowledge do this, i've dont what i was able, but there is more info to be added on extended/alt versions of songs on the vinyl pressing. --AlexOvShaolin 22:48, 10 January 2008 (UTC)

Suggestions

1. The History section needs a rewrite and much better sourcing. The opening part reads, "The album was not as much of a commercial success as The Downward Spiral, most likely accredited to Interscope Records' lack of promotion of the album, and the lack of a stand-out single. Despite a strong start at #1 on the Billboard Top 10, the album quickly slipped out of the Billboard Top 10 only a week after its release, and Reznor was forced to provide funding for the subsequent North American tour out of his own pocket.[1]" A few problems. The source for this cannot be found. There especially needs to be a reliable source for the opening statement here, where it claims the album was not a commercial success compared to TDS and that this is likely due to poor promotion by the record label.

The last three sentences of this section, which are all stand-alone paragraphs, read more like a collection of facts than they do about the history of the album. They need to be distributed more appropriately into the article.

2. The Critical Response section has no sources and I'm puzzled as to why the review from Pitchfork was taken with such seriousness as to warrant mention in the article, much less in the side box with the rest of the reviews. I think, if we're going to use a variety of reviews that include both praise and criticism, we might want to use a better, more professionally done review than the review from Pitchfork, as well as include quotes from the reviewers to supplement the section.

3. Many songs from this album have been used in various movies, and TV shows, including 300, Man on Fire, Final Destination, CSI, etc. A section could be made to reflect this and other uses of songs from this album in popular culture, including any covers.

4. The Track Listing section and "The New Flesh" sections need sources.

5. Could benefit from a few more fair use images. --Ubiq (talk) 17:16, 26 April 2008 (UTC)


I strongly suggest you change some things... first - "The album continues the plot of The Downward Spiral, despite the complete change in sound and style of the album. Instead of heavily distorted instruments, and gritty industrial sounds, the album relies much more on soundscapes, electronic beats, ambient noise, and heavy metal-laden guitar, such as in the single Starfuckers, Inc." - I don't know who initially wrote this, but I strongly disagree. First and foremost, The Downward Spiral and The Fragile are two VERY similar albums...second...how in a world can you say "despites complete change in sound and style of the album"???????? are you serious??? "instead of heavily distorted instruments and gritty industrial sounds..." again - ARE YOU SERIOUS?!?!?! The Fragile is just as heavily distorted and gritty industrial-sounding as The Downward Spiral... Tracks like - Somewhat Damaged, The Wretched, Pilgrimage, Where Is Everybody?, The Big Came Down, Starfuckers - what more distorted can you get!? what more industrial-sounding can you get? - yes I know TDS is also, of course, but the point is that both are pretty alike. I insanely love both TDS and TF and I just want to turn your attention on this, with the good intentions of course... In my opinion it is pretty wrong...I understand if someone wrote "its a little bit different then The Downward Spiral" but exaggerating THIS much, for some mysterious reason is pretty wrong IMO.--VEGETA_DTX (talk) 12:15, 27 July 2008 (UTC)

A continuation to The Downward Sprial?

Alot of people say that it isn't a continuation, People outside Wikipedia in forums like Songmeanings.comsongmeanings say that The Fragile is it's own album and not a continuation. This continuation thing isn't really a fact, but a theory of what Trent Reznor thinks it is. Should that be taken off or left? A theory isn't a fact is it? --Nightingale12 (talk) 07:25, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

Sorry, delete that last comment.

That was refering to the time before it was edited, my bad. delete this comment and the other one. Preceding unsigned comment added by Nightingale12 (talk contribs) 07:36, 30 April 2008 (UTC)

Concept Album

I know this is one of those albums that everyone calls a concept album, but is there an proof of this? No sources online call it one, I don't remember Trent ever really describing a concept, and I can't find a single reliable source that calls it one?. Ridernyc (talk) 13:53, 8 August 2010 (UTC)

Genres

If people feel the genres for this article should differ from the con consensus reached at Talk:Nine Inch Nails, they need to speak up and form a consensus, not simply keep changing them at whim, to whatever source happens to agree with them. You can source this article to dozens of genres if you wanted to. Ridernyc (talk) 22:56, 27 January 2013 (UTC)

As Nine Inch Nails and the Fragile articles are seperate, the consensus on the main article's genres do not necessarily apply to this albums article. (As far as I can see the consensus is only reached for the main band article) Besides the art rock classification (which is sourced [1]), I'm in favor of the classifications such as industrial rock or alternative rock (or maybe dark ambient). Myxomatosis57 (talk) 23:02, 27 January 2013 (UTC) I agree but as there is no consensus here and a total refusal of people to discuss these constant changes the only way I can see to settle the debate until there is a discussion is to point to the main article. I'm all for the Industrial and Alternative labels I think Art Rock is far too broad and meaningless. I'm not sure Dark Ambient really applies to this album, but would not object to it. Ridernyc (talk) 23:06, 27 January 2013 (UTC) Also am I safe in assuming we would both agree that removing all the genres and leaving only Art Rock is not really appropriate and fails to describe that style of the album. Ridernyc (talk) 23:09, 27 January 2013 (UTC) Actually, I think you might be right about art roc. Art rock would just look obsolete and confusing all next to the other genres. However. I think we can express the art rock labeling in the article's body, I guess. And I definitely agree upon the last statement you made; removing all other genres and leaving only art rock would be just misleading and wrong. Myxomatosis57 (talk) 23:15, 27 January 2013 (UTC) If you ask me what style an album is that and I say Art Rock it's not descriptive at all. I would argue I'm not even sure if it is a genre. If you read the Art Rock article they list everything from the Steve Miller Band to Laurie Anderson in the article. Seems to be just a catch all for "not mainstream and different". Ridernyc (talk) 23:27, 27 January 2013 (UTC) I guess the only reason for art rock labeling was album's new soundscapes, ambient tone and more melodic structure, which starkly contrasted chaotic The Downward Spiral and was new to the band. Apart from this, I can't see any other reasons to affilate this album with this labeling. Myxomatosis57 (talk) 23:39, 27 January 2013 (UTC) Consensus isnt needed if it's sourced. A source verifies it. Find a different source verifying your position. I'm not going to start a discussion on our opinions. Dan56 (talk) 23:50, 27 January 2013 (UTC) If you're challenging the sourced material, you're doing it b/c you dont agree with it, which is genre warring. As is reducing one artist/group to certain labels (User:Realist2/Genre Warrior#Behavior pattern and motivations). Dan56 (talk) 23:52, 27 January 2013 (UTC) Regardless of what you believe consensus can override sourcing particularly an area such as this where sourcing is known to fall short. YOu are displaying some major WP:Ownership issues now. Ridernyc (talk) 23:56, 27 January 2013 (UTC) Cite a guideline please. You are disagreeing with a reputed source that calls it an art rock album. Replacing another genre warrior/IP's genre change with your own unsourced changes is the same thing. Consensus is useful when there are conflicting sources, but you arent bothering to find any to begin with. If we really get a consensus among editors who understand the importance of verifiability and NPOV guidelines, then I would be seriously surprised if that "overrides" verifiability. Sourcing doesnt fall short if the source cited conflicts with your personl opinion on music genres. We instead use verifiable public or scholarly critiques to describe aesthetic opinions (WP:SUBJECTIVE), such as genres. Dan56 (talk) 00:25, 28 January 2013 (UTC) So do you want to build consensus or do you want to fling essays at each other? Not interested in going down this road with you and if you continues to argue against consensus building I will have no issue going to the appropriate notice boards. A quick look at your block logs shows you should be very familiar with the process. Ridernyc (talk) 00:32, 28 January 2013 (UTC)

Genres are a thing that change from album to album, song to song. Not every single thing an artist (or band in this case) releases is the same genre. Just because a band is generally one genre, doesn't make everything they release the same one. If they did a, I don't know, dubstep album, would it still be "Industrial rock, industrial metal, alternative rock, alternative metal, dark ambient"? Of course it wouldn't. That's ridiculous. There's a reliable source stating the album is art rock. Provide a source otherwise, or move on. Also, may I remind you of a little thing we call "no personal attacks". "Comment on the content, not the editor". What exactly does Dan's block log have to do with the genre of an album, again? Remind me, I must be forgetting. Stat?s(talk, contribs) 01:09, 28 January 2013 (UTC)

Show me where Dan has commented on the content of the album? His total resistance to discussion is where that comment comes from.Ridernyc (talk) 01:14, 28 January 2013 (UTC) Show me where you've provided a source to prove the album isn't art rock. That's right! You haven't. He doesn't have to. Stat?s(talk, contribs) 01:17, 28 January 2013 (UTC) Show me where Dan has provided a source that states it is not the 4 other genres he has removed twice. We can go back and forth like this all night. That's why we work with consensus and do not blindly follow sources. Ridernyc (talk) 01:20, 28 January 2013 (UTC) The burden of proof is on the one who disagrees. I actually can't believe you just said that. Stat?s(talk, contribs) 01:27, 28 January 2013 (UTC) I just repeated what you did to me so not sure why you seem to think it's so unbelievable. So anyway do you have comments on the album, or you just here to further derail this because as far I can this is going nowhere fast. We are simply trying to build a consensus here and all this distraction is not helping. Moving on. Ridernyc (talk) 01:30, 28 January 2013 (UTC) You clearly haven't even read what I said. No consensus is needed here. There's a source. It calls the album art rock. End of story. Unless you'd like to bring up a source calling it something else, it's art rock. The burden of proof is on you. If you can't provide a source for anything else, move on. If you can, feel free to share it and add it to the article. Stat?s(talk, contribs) 01:36, 28 January 2013 (UTC) Both of you can keep saying that but it plain and simply is not true. So as I said moving on. Ridernyc (talk) 01:39, 28 January 2013 (UTC) It is. You can keep saying otherwise, but that's untrue. Stat?s(talk, contribs) 01:44, 28 January 2013 (UTC) Schemin', are we? Maybe you should readjust your perspective on genres here with what professional music journalists have written about this album? If you really want to a consensus, then I'll present a straight flush of professional critiques on this particular aesthetic opinion: Rolling Stone ("NINs monumental double-disc bid for the art-rock crown"), USA Today ("art-rock opus"), Will Hermes ("art-rock epic"), Ann Powers ("the art rock of King Crimson and Roxy Music ... borrows details of those styles"). And the funny thing is I didnt have some genre warrior's predisposition that made me Google "The Fragile" with "industrial rock". All I did was research the most reliable sources on the topic while I was looking through reviews to expand this article, and voila!. It is what it is: the majority of public or scholarly critiques for this topic seem to say "art rock", so what's the big deal? Dan56 (talk) 11:26, 28 January 2013 (UTC) I do not object to "art rock" label. It is sourced and further mention of this classification exists. Nevertheless, sole classification of "art rock" is misleading and inadequate, considering the depictions of industrial, (the album manages to be still industrial) noise and ambient properties in the reviews. To fill this up, I've tried to find some other explicit sources. I've found a source (which I thought that would satisfy the policies) about industrial rock. However, at the end, I was deemed as to be a typical genre warrior who deserved to be sneered at, although the industrial rock edit was sourced. (Nevertheless, I must also admit that I've made a stupid mistake by misinterpreting the A.V. Club source. Sorry for that.) I guess there isn't any confusion left though, considering that everything is sourced. Myxomatosis57 (talk) 17:43, 28 January 2013 (UTC)

The Fragile motif

[Firstly, go to youtube or grab your album because you're going to need it.]

A careful listener can name at least 4 motifs (but who knows, there can be more!) of "The Fragile":

1. (mentioned in the article) "THE FRAIL" piano melody is later played on guitar in "THE FRAGILE".

2. (mentioned in the article) the piano melody which appears at the end of "WE'RE IN THIS TOGETHER" in a tempo of 100BPM is later played in 124BPM on "LA MER" and on "INTO THE VOID". (of course these two songs share some more elements than just the piano theme).

Now the less obvious stuff:

3. In the song "THE GREAT BELOW" there is a three-note melody played between the words "I can still feel you" and "even so far away" (many times in the song). The words "All I do" from "Underneath It All" are sung in exactly the same melody. Moreover, the words, "I can still feel you" are also sung in the same way in both songs.

4. Part of the acoustic guitar melody motif introduced in the 17th second of "THE BIG COME DOWN" is later played in the last song "RIPE (WITH DECAY) (only on CD and casette versions) starting with 6:03 in the song.

5. As a bonus: the wordless vocal harmonies from "THE GREAT BELOW" are shared with "AND ALL THAT COULD HAVE BEEN", a fan-favourite non-album song from The Fragile era of NIN.;)

You can check it out yourself.

And my point is: should these informations be written in the article? They are very interesting and add depth to the album. Everyone can check what I have written. So it's kind of reliable. So? I think it would be nice to write at least that there are more motifs on The Fragile than it seems. Reznor did a great job with the album, why not inform others about it? I'm really curious of your answers. PS Sorry for all the mistakes, I'm a non-english speaker. Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.6.174.199 (talk) 12:57, 1 February 2013 (UTC)

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Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Talk:The_Fragile_(Nine_Inch_Nails_album)&oldid=850213579" NineInch Nails The Fragile Album Art

About The Fragile Album Art

Analysis of The Fragile cover.

Via ArtGenius

"The Fragile Album Art" Track Info

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The Fragile Album Art

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